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Linux

Chmod Squad: HOWTO Use Linux File Permissions

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3713 Comments
Tutorial quote: A complete new user's guide to the Linux file permission system, with examples. Be mystified no more by cryptic file permission bits.
Debian

ACL(Access Control List) Configuration

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3069 Comments
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
Debian

Triggering Commands On File/Directory Changes With Incron

Post date: September 2, 2008, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3440 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can install and use incron on a Debian Etch system. Incron is similar to cron, but instead of running commands based on time, it can trigger commands when file or directory events occur (e.g. a file modification, changes of permissions, etc.).
Gentoo

Share Directories via AFP

Post date: October 20, 2006, 17:10 Category: Network Views: 7068 Comments
Tutorial quote: This HOWTO is mainly geared towards PPC users or users who need to share files between Linux and Tiger 10.4. As you're probably aware, Apple SMB is broken in Tiger and God only knows how long it'll take them to fix it. So this is an alternative that's both easier and provides faster file transfers under OS X's native file transport protocol, AFP (Apple File Protocol).
FreeBSD

Using FreeBSD's ACLs

Post date: September 29, 2005, 17:09 Category: Security Views: 3436 Comments
Tutorial quote: Five years ago (gee, has it really been that long?), I wrote a series of articles on understanding Unix permissions. Since then, FreeBSD has implemented something known as ACLs (Access Control Lists).

ACLs came to BSD as part of the TrustedBSD project. As the name suggests, they give a user finer access control over permissions.
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Linux

LDAP Authentication In Linux

Post date: August 26, 2006, 06:08 Category: Security Views: 5408 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto will show you howto store your users in LDAP and authenticate some of the services against it. I will not show howto install particular packages, as it is distribution/system dependant. I will focus on "pure" configuration of all componenets needed to have LDAP authentication/storage of users. The howto assumes somehow, that you are migrating from a regular passwd/shadow authentication, but it is also suitable for people who do it from scratch.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 2505 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Unix+clones

Chkrootkit Portsentry Howto

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Security Views: 2769 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install chkrootkit and portsentry. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems.

Chkrootkit "is a tool to locally check for signs of a rootkit" (from http://www.chkrootkit.org).

"The Sentry tools provide host-level security services for the Unix platform. PortSentry, Logcheck/LogSentry, and HostSentry protect against portscans, automate log file auditing, and detect suspicious login activity on a continuous basis" (from http://sourceforge.net/projects/sentrytools/).

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Ubuntu

Simple Home File Server (Based On Ubuntu)

Post date: January 27, 2008, 11:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4575 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to turn an old PC with additional hard disks into a simple home file server. The file server is intended for home use. The home file server is accessible by Windows and Linux computers in the home network.
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