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OpenSUSE

HowTo: Install configure KVM Virtualization & run Guest OSes in openSUSE

Post date: September 30, 2008, 21:09 Category: Emulation Views: 7157 Comments
Tutorial quote: Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a Linux kernel virtualization infrastructure. KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions Intel VT (vmx) or AMD-V (svm). It consists of a loadable kernel module, kvm.ko, that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor specific module, kvm-intel.ko or kvm-amd.ko. KVM also requires a modified QEMU although work is underway to get the required changes upstream.
Unix+clones

SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3824 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
OpenSUSE

TrueCrypt - Free opensource on the fly Disk Encryption tool

Post date: August 7, 2008, 22:08 Category: Security Views: 4224 Comments
Tutorial quote: TrueCrypt is a free opensource software system for establishing and maintaining an on-the-fly-encrypted volume (data storage device). On-the-fly encryption means that data are automatically encrypted or decrypted right before they are loaded or saved, without any user intervention. No data stored on an encrypted volume can be read (decrypted) without using the correct password/keyfile(s) or correct encryption keys. Entire file system is encrypted (e.g., file names, folder names, contents of every file, free space, meta data, etc).
Ubuntu

Howto Setup Dual Monitors with NVidia in Ubuntu

Post date: May 21, 2007, 00:05 Category: System Views: 5393 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to setup Dual Monitors with NVidia in Ubuntu.It’s quite a pain to get dual monitors working your first time using Linux, however I hope this guide will make the process relatively quick and painless.
Debian

Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ

Post date: March 20, 2006, 20:03 Category: System Views: 4051 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
Linux

shred - Securely delete files in Linux

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Security Views: 5379 Comments
Tutorial quote: In case you want to delete some confidential data from your computer just to make sure that it is no longer accessible to anyone, then do not delete the file using the regular rm command because there will still remain a chance that someone might use a software to recover your deleted data before the specific storage area is overwritten by new data. The proper way to permanently dispose of such data in Linux is the shred command.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3784 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Linux

Install Java JRE 1.6.0 (Update x) in Linux as the Default Java Runtime, including Firefox Browser Plugin

Post date: March 29, 2009, 05:03 Category: Installing Views: 7539 Comments
Tutorial quote: HowTo for installing the latest version of Sun's Java JRE on 32 and 64 bit Linux systems, and set it to run as the default JRE for all Java applications. The tutorial also includes installing the Java JRE Firefox Browser plugin. The tutorial is regularly updated to reflect the latest version of JRE.
Debian

Protect Your Files With TrueCrypt 5.1a On Debian Etch (GNOME)

Post date: May 13, 2008, 10:05 Category: Desktop Views: 3956 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up TrueCrypt 5.1a on Debian Etch (GNOME). Taken from the TrueCrypt page: "TrueCrypt is a software system for establishing and maintaining an on-the-fly-encrypted volume (data storage device). On-the-fly encryption means that data are automatically encrypted or decrypted right before they are loaded or saved, without any user intervention. No data stored on an encrypted volume can be read (decrypted) without using the correct password/keyfile(s) or correct encryption keys. Entire file system is encrypted (e.g., file names, folder names, contents of every file, free space, meta data, etc)."
Linux

Accessing Windows Or Samba Shares Using AutoFS

Post date: December 14, 2006, 20:12 Category: Network Views: 4817 Comments
Tutorial quote: You already installed Linux on your networked desktop PC and now you want to work with files stored on some other PCs in your network. This is where autofs comes into play. This tutorial shows how to configure autofs to use CIFS to access Windows or Samba shares from Linux Desktop PCs. It also includes a tailored configuration file.
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