Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Directory Directions...a Guide to the Linux File System

Linux

Directory Directions...a Guide to the Linux File System

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3252 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever wonder what those short Linux file system folders mean and what they contain? A little tour with easy directions explains all here.
Debian

Triggering Commands On File/Directory Changes With Incron

Post date: September 2, 2008, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3486 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can install and use incron on a Debian Etch system. Incron is similar to cron, but instead of running commands based on time, it can trigger commands when file or directory events occur (e.g. a file modification, changes of permissions, etc.).
Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4399 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Debian

Setting Up Unison File Synchronization Between Two Servers On Debian Squeeze

Post date: August 9, 2011, 08:08 Category: Installing Views: 1980 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up file synchronization between two Debian Squeeze servers with Unison. Unison is a file-synchronization tool similar to rsync, but the big difference is that it tracks/synchronizes changes in both directions, i.e., files changed on server1 will be replicated to server2 and vice versa.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With TimeVault On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: December 20, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3248 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up, configure and use TimeVault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.
Linux

Linux Directory Structure Overview

Post date: March 26, 2008, 10:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3694 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the most noticeable differences between Linux and Windows is the directory structure. Not only is the format different, but the logic of where to find things is different.This tutorial will explain about Linux Directory Structure Overview with graphical image.
Linux

Chmod Squad: HOWTO Use Linux File Permissions

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3761 Comments
Tutorial quote: A complete new user's guide to the Linux file permission system, with examples. Be mystified no more by cryptic file permission bits.
Linux

Recursively Encrypt / Decrypt Directories using gpgdir on Linux

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Security Views: 4589 Comments
Tutorial quote: gpgdir is a script that encrypts and decrypts directories using a GPG key. It supports recursively descending through a directory in order to make sure it encrypts or decrypts every file in a directory and all of its subdirectories.
Debian

Removing Unwanted Startup Debian Files or Services

Post date: January 5, 2007, 07:01 Category: System Views: 3503 Comments
Tutorial quote: Under Debian Linux ( and most other distros) startup files are stored in /etc/init.d/ directory and symbolic linked between /etc/rcX.d/ directory exists. Debian Linux (Red Hat/ Fedora) uses System V initialization scripts to start services at boot time from /etc/rcX.d/ directory. Debian Linux comes with different utilities to remove unwanted startup files.
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3338 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink