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Search results for Directory Directions...a Guide to the Linux File System

Debian

Version Control For Your /etc Directory With etckeeper/Bazaar On Debian Squeeze

Post date: July 17, 2011, 18:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2546 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can store the contents of your /etc directory in a version control system (VCS) with the help of etckeeper on Debian Squeeze. etckeeper hooks into Debian's package manager apt so that whenever you install/remove a package with apt, etckeeper will commit all changes to the /etc directory to your VCS; it also tracks file metadata such as permissions which is important for files such as /etc/shadow. Using etckeeper, you can go back to a previous version of /etc if an update has overwritten valuable configuration files. Not only will etckeeper track apt's changes to /etc, it will also do a daily auto-commit so that your manual changes go to VCS as well; in addition to that, you can do commits at any time manually.
Unix+clones

Create your own init.d scripts

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: System Views: 7681 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have a Linux executable that you would like to run as a daemon? Making your own init.d scripts can be a bit tricky, but I can help you out.

The directory /etc/init.d/ is a location on a Linux file system that contains scripts for changing init states.

For details on Linux run levels look here.

The run levels that are most important to us are 2, 3 and 5.

VERY basic sample init.d script (Replace italics respectively):
OpenSUSE

Krusader - Advanced Twinpanel File Manager in openSUSE

Post date: October 10, 2008, 22:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3358 Comments
Tutorial quote: Krusader is an advanced twin panel (commander style) file manager for KDE and other desktops in the *nix world, similar to Midnight or Total Commander. It provides all the file management features you could possibly want with features like extensive archive handling, mounted filesystem support, FTP, advanced search module, an internal viewer/editor, directory synchronisation, file content comparisons, powerful batch renaming and much much more
Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3204 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 2573 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Gentoo

Gentoo on MAC OSX

Post date: April 12, 2005, 15:04 Category: Installing Views: 3035 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing Gentoo for Mac OS X is as easy as simply following the directions below.
Debian

Mandriva Directory Server On Debian Etch

Post date: February 7, 2008, 12:02 Category: Network Views: 3376 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up the Mandriva Directory Server (MDS) on Debian Etch. The resulting system provides a full-featured office server for small and medium companies - easy to administer via the web-based Mandriva Management Console (MMC).
Ubuntu

Furius ISO Mount - Mount and Unmount ISO images with GUI Tool in Ubuntu Linux

Post date: August 31, 2008, 17:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3260 Comments
Tutorial quote: An ISO, IMG, BIN, MDF and NRG Image management utility for the Gnome Desktop Environment. Furius ISO Mount

Features
* Automatically Mounts ISO, IMG, BIN, MDF and NRG Image Files.
* Automatically creates a mount point in your home directory.
* Automatically Unmounts the Image files.
* Automatically removes the mount directory to return your home directory to its previous state.
RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6112 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Post date: September 11, 2007, 22:09 Category: Installing Views: 3254 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation. The resulting Ubuntu installation is a "real" Linux system, not just a virtual machine. Wubi makes it easy for Linux newbies to play around with Ubuntu.
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