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Linux

How the One-Liner For-Loop in Bash Goes

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 4305 Comments
Tutorial quote: A mini-guide to one of the coolest tricks at the Bash command line - performing the same operation on a whole group of files at once using the "for-do-done" loop syntax.
OpenSUSE

SuSE 10.1 Installation Manual

Post date: October 28, 2006, 01:10 Category: Installing Views: 7561 Comments
Tutorial quote: A simple guide to openSUSE 10.1 installation with screenshots. Also explains the process of network install and has a section on post-install configuration.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Post date: May 24, 2011, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 3369 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Post date: December 15, 2009, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 4951 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Debian

Filtering PDF-/XLS-/Image-Spam With ClamAV (And ISPConfig) On Debian/Ubuntu

Post date: July 24, 2007, 02:07 Category: Security Views: 4201 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is currently a lot of spam where the spam information is attached as .pdf or .xls files, sometime also hidden inside a .zip file. While these spam mails are not easy to catch with e.g. SpamAssassin or a Bayes filter, the ClamAV virus scanner can catch them easily when it is fed with the correct signatures as ClamAV is built to scan mail attachments.
OpenSUSE

Network Performance Fine Tuning in openSUSE & SUSE

Post date: October 8, 2008, 23:10 Category: Network Views: 5127 Comments
Tutorial quote: openSUSE and SUSE Linux sets default values for some of the network related Kernel parameters. With Kernel 2.6 (default in recent releases of openSUSE & SuSE Linux), there are some fine tuning you can do to improve Network performance and get that extra out of your system.
Unix+clones

SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3816 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
CentOS

How To Monitor A System With Sysstat On Centos 4.3

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: System Views: 7040 Comments
Tutorial quote: A common task for System Administrators is to monitor and care for a server. That's fairly easy to do at a moment's notice, but how to keep a record of this information over time? One way to monitor your server is to use the Sysstat package.

Sysstat is actually a collection of utilities designed to collect information about the performance of a linux installation, and record them over time.

It's fairly easy to install too, since it is included as a package on many distributions.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 3158 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Debian

Intrusion Detection With BASE And Snort

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Security Views: 5361 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure BASE (Basic Analysis and Security Engine) and the Snort intrusion detection system (IDS) on a Debian Sarge system. BASE provides a web front-end to query and analyze the alerts coming from a Snort IDS system. With BASE you can perform analysis of intrusions that Snort has detected on your network.

Scenario: A linux server running Debian Sarge 3.1 setup according to Falko's - The Perfect Setup - Debian Sarge (3.1).
Let's assume we have one working website (www.example.com) and that the document root is: /var/www/www.example.com/web
The IP of the server is 192.168.0.5 and it's using eth0 as network interface name.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink