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Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3020 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Debian

How To Search For Missing Packages With apt-file On Debian and Ubuntu

Post date: February 21, 2007, 19:02 Category: System Views: 3136 Comments
Tutorial quote: This short article describes how you can search for missing packages with apt-file on Debian and Ubuntu systems. apt-file allows you to search for a file name, and it gives back the name(s) of the package(s) containing that file so that you can install the appropriate package.
Ubuntu

Creating Your Own Custom Ubuntu 7.10 Or Linux Mint 4.0 Live-CD With Remastersys

Post date: December 4, 2007, 11:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4183 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can create a Live-CD from your Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon or Linux Mint 4.0 system with a tool called remastersys. Remastersys is available in the Linux Mint romeo repository. You can customize your Ubuntu/Linux Mint system and then let remastersys create an iso image of it which you can then burn onto a CD/DVD.
OpenSUSE

TrueCrypt - Free opensource on the fly Disk Encryption tool

Post date: August 7, 2008, 22:08 Category: Security Views: 3344 Comments
Tutorial quote: TrueCrypt is a free opensource software system for establishing and maintaining an on-the-fly-encrypted volume (data storage device). On-the-fly encryption means that data are automatically encrypted or decrypted right before they are loaded or saved, without any user intervention. No data stored on an encrypted volume can be read (decrypted) without using the correct password/keyfile(s) or correct encryption keys. Entire file system is encrypted (e.g., file names, folder names, contents of every file, free space, meta data, etc).
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2932 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
OpenSUSE

Setting Up An NFS Server And Client On OpenSUSE 11.3

Post date: September 19, 2010, 15:09 Category: Installing Views: 2944 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up an NFS server and an NFS client on OpenSUSE 11.3. NFS stands for Network File System; through NFS, a client can access (read, write) a remote share on an NFS server as if it was on the local hard disk.
CentOS

Setting Up An NFS Server And Client On CentOS 5.5

Post date: September 28, 2010, 11:09 Category: Installing Views: 3669 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up an NFS server and an NFS client on CentOS 5.5. NFS stands for Network File System; through NFS, a client can access (read, write) a remote share on an NFS server as if it was on the local hard disk.
Ubuntu

Setting Up An NFS Server And Client On Ubuntu 10.04

Post date: October 7, 2010, 14:10 Category: Installing Views: 2524 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up an NFS server and an NFS client on Ubuntu 10.04. NFS stands for Network File System; through NFS, a client can access (read, write) a remote share on an NFS server as if it was on the local hard disk.
Debian

Protect Your Files With TrueCrypt 5.1a On Debian Etch (GNOME)

Post date: May 13, 2008, 10:05 Category: Desktop Views: 3178 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up TrueCrypt 5.1a on Debian Etch (GNOME). Taken from the TrueCrypt page: "TrueCrypt is a software system for establishing and maintaining an on-the-fly-encrypted volume (data storage device). On-the-fly encryption means that data are automatically encrypted or decrypted right before they are loaded or saved, without any user intervention. No data stored on an encrypted volume can be read (decrypted) without using the correct password/keyfile(s) or correct encryption keys. Entire file system is encrypted (e.g., file names, folder names, contents of every file, free space, meta data, etc)."
Linux

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Post date: January 28, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 4454 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system. On the clients minimal to no configuration is needed. BackupPC supports full and incremental backups, and it comes with a neat web frontend for the administrator and normal user so that backups and recoveries can be managed through a web browser. It should be noted, however, that BackupPC does file-based backups, not bit-wise backups like Ghost4Linux, for example, so it is not made for disk/partition imaging.
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