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Debian

Splitting lighttpd Logs With vlogger And Creating Statistics With Webalizer

Post date: January 31, 2008, 13:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3833 Comments
Tutorial quote: Vlogger is a little tool with which you can write lighttpd logs broken down by virtual hosts and days. With vlogger, we need to put just one accesslog.filename directive into our global lighttpd configuration, and it will write access logs for each virtual host and day. Therefore, you do not have to split lighttpd's overall access log into access logs for each virtual host each day, and you do not have to configure lighttpd to write one access log per virtual host (which could make you run out of file descriptors very fast). At the end of this tutorial I will show you how to use webalizer to create statistics from the lighttpd access logs.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 3289 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Ubuntu

Android App Build Environment Setup With Eclipse, PhoneGap (Ubuntu 11.04)

Post date: June 28, 2011, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 3051 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how you can set up an development environment for building Android apps on an Ubuntu 11.04 desktop using Eclipse, the Android SDK, and PhoneGap. I will describe how to build Android apps from the command line with PhoneGap and from the GUI with Eclipse and PhoneGap and how to test them in an Android emulator and on a real Android device. PhoneGap allows you to develop your Android applications using web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (e.g. with JavaScript libraries such as jQuery/jQTouch), and it will turn these web apps into native Android apps (in fact, PhoneGap supports multiple platforms such as Android, iPhone, Palm, Windows Mobile, Symbian, so you can use the same sources to create apps for multiple platforms).
Unix+clones

Execute Commands on Multiple Linux or UNIX Servers part II

Post date: December 28, 2005, 10:12 Category: System Views: 3901 Comments
Tutorial quote: I have already covered how to execute commands on multiple Linux or UNIX servers via shell script. The disadvantage of script is commands do not run in parallel on all servers. However, several tools exist to automate this procedure in parallel. With the help of tool called tentakel, you run distributed command execution. It is a program for executing the same command on many hosts in parallel using ssh (it supports other methods too). Main advantage is you can create several sets of servers according requirements. For example webserver group, mail server group, home servers group etc. The command is executed in parallel on all servers in this group (time saving). By default, every result is printed to stdout (screen). The output format can be defined for each group.
Unix+clones

Python Programming for Beginners

Post date: September 19, 2006, 09:09 Category: Programming Views: 45461 Comments
Tutorial quote: Despite what assembly code and C coders might tell us, high-level languages do have their place in every programmer's toolbox, and some of them are much more than a computer-science curiosity. Out of the many high-level languages we can choose from today, Python seems to be the most interesting for those who want to learn something new and do real work at the same time. Its no-nonsense implementation of object-oriented programming and its clean and easy-to-understand syntax make it a language that is fun to learn and use, which is not something we can say about most other languages.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write applications that use command-line options, read and write to pipes, access environment variables, handle interrupts, read from and write to files, create temporary files and write to system logs. In other words, you will find recipes for writing real applications instead of the old boring Hello, World! stuff.
Fedora

Android App Build Environment With Eclipse, Android SDK, PhoneGap (Fedora 14)

Post date: February 1, 2011, 13:02 Category: Installing Views: 2674 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how you can set up a development environment for building Android apps on a Fedora 14 desktop using Eclipse, the Android SDK, and PhoneGap. I will describe how to build Android apps from the command line with PhoneGap and from the GUI with Eclipse and PhoneGap and how to test them in an Android emulator and on a real Android device. PhoneGap allows you to develop your Android applications using web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (e.g. with JavaScript libraries such as jQuery/jQTouch), and it will turn these web apps into native Android apps (in fact, PhoneGap supports multiple platforms such as Android, iPhone, Palm, Windows Mobile, Symbian, so you can use the same sources to create apps for multiple platforms).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3856 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Ubuntu

Setting Up An Android App Build Environment With Eclipse, Android SDK, PhoneGap (Ubuntu 10.10)

Post date: January 27, 2011, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 3107 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how you can set up a development environment for building Android apps on an Ubuntu 10.10 desktop using Eclipse, the Android SDK, and PhoneGap. I will describe how to build Android apps from the command line with PhoneGap and from the GUI with Eclipse and PhoneGap and how to test them in an Android emulator and on a real Android device. PhoneGap allows you to develop your Android applications using web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (e.g. with JavaScript libraries such as jQuery/jQTouch), and it will turn these web apps into native Android apps (in fact, PhoneGap supports multiple platforms such as Android, iPhone, Palm, Windows Mobile, Symbian, so you can use the same sources to create apps for multiple platforms).
Debian

How To Install VMware Server On Debian 4.0 (Etch)

Post date: April 24, 2007, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 4047 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.2) on a Debian Etch system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free). In this article we use Debian Etch (4.0) as the host operating system.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 5488 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
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