Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for What's up, Doc? A guide to Linux Documentation

Linux

What's up, Doc? A guide to Linux Documentation

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 2826 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're new to Linux, you've probably been told to read the manual, but what good is that advice if you don't know where the manuals are or how to use them? Here, in one place, is complate instructions on how to find and navigate the common Linux documentation systems, including man, info, READMEs, HOWTOs, HTML, PDF/PS, DocBook, Gnome and KDE help system, and command-line option conventions. The guide I wish I'd had when I was new to Linux!
Gentoo

Painless sound mixing using ALSA

Post date: May 13, 2005, 05:05 Category: Multimedia Views: 3706 Comments
Tutorial quote: This Doc is only meant to supplement the preexisting ALSA guide offered by the Gentoo folks.

Just thought I might want to add to the existing information about sound mixing using alsa. Here's what you need to do in order to use sound mixing in ALSA.
Linux

Grub From the Ground Up

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Software Views: 2745 Comments
Tutorial quote: Grub is a world-class boot loader with insufficient documentation. In many ways it blows the doors of LILO. For instance, it's MUCH easier to use Knoppix to rebuild a grub boot loader than to rebuild a LILO boot loader. However, until you're comfortable with grub, it might seem just the opposite. All too often grub dumps you at a grub> prompt with no hint of what you should do. You might have heard that a successful reboot is just three commands away, but which commands? The state of grub's documentation is such that you can't figure it out unless you already know grub.

That catch 22 is the very purpose of this document. This document will to give you enough grub expertise that you can create a grub boot floppy on a working machine with grub installed (not necessarily as the bootloader, just installed), and use that floppy to bust back into a Linux machine with a blown bootloader, and then use that floppy to actually install grub as the bootloader.

This document does not discuss using grub to boot or dual boot Windows, mach, BSD, or other non-Linux operating systems. I might write on that subject later. But in the meantime, once you're familiar with the principles and practices of grub, given some study of existing documentation you'll probably be able to use grub to boot non-Linux operating systems.
OSX

A mini-guide to Mac OS X for new Mini owners

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3532 Comments
Tutorial quote: One thing the Mac mini does not have is a comprehensive “welcome to OS X” guide. Printed documentation included with the mini is scanty — primarily EULA and warranty information, and Apple has never been one for flashy tutorials. That’s why we at Ars have pulled together a short list of things every newcomer to Mac OS X needs to know.

This guide is not intended to be comprehensive and answer every conceivable question Windows and Linux users will have about their new platform. What it does intend to do is give you the lowdown on some basic things: window management, accessing your Windows box from the Mac, and application behavior.
FreeBSD

Upgrading FreeBSD

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 3569 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3109 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
Ubuntu

LAMP Installation On Ubuntu 6.06 For Beginners

Post date: August 29, 2006, 16:08 Category: Installing Views: 40569 Comments
Tutorial quote: I, like many others, made the decision to attempt an install of Ubuntu 6.06 server with the preconfigured LAMP option without having ever attempted using Linux before. My goal was to build a setup that I could host my personal web site from. [...] Hence, I am writing this as a partial documentation of my trials and tribulations with hopes of aiding all Linux noobs on the steps necessary to create a basic Linux, Apache2, MySQL5 and PHP5 system with FTP.
Linux

Make Your Linux Desktop Look Like A Mac - Mac4Lin Project Documentation

Post date: October 30, 2007, 11:10 Category: Desktop Views: 6463 Comments
Tutorial quote: Do you want to give your desktop a dash of Mac OS X? The goal of this project is to bring the look and feel of Mac OS X (latest being 10.5, Leopard) to *nix GTK based systems. This document will present the procedure to install Mac4Lin pack & tweak certain things to get that almost perfect Mac OS X like desktop.
Ubuntu

Disable unnecessary services in Ubuntu - Boot-Up Manager

Post date: November 17, 2008, 11:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 8952 Comments
Tutorial quote: The startup scripts located in /etc/init.d are part of the bootup sequence of every Debian-like distro. Very often Ubuntu's documentation and guides have suggested - in order to deactivate init scripts - to change the permissions of the scripts in /etc/init.d, making them non-executable.
Linux

Creating DjVu Documents Linux HOWTO

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3682 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains some of the uses of djvulibre implementation of DjVu for creating quality DjVu documents in linux. DjVu format features bitmap document compression and hypertext structure. It is used by numerous web sites all around the world for storing and distributing digital documents including scanned documents and high-resolution pictures. One of the advantages of DjVu files is that they are notably small, often smaller than PDF or JPEG files with the same content. This makes DjVu a helpful tool for digitizing books and journals, especially scientific ones.

Below it is considered the case when a DjVu document is created from a number of separate JPEG files each containing a single page. Here JPEG format is not a limitation, and the examples can cover arbitrary image formats. Conversion from PDF to DjVu is also discussed. Usage of scanner software is not explained: refer to the relevant documentation.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink