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Search results for A couple of tricks with the secure shell

FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: April 3, 2006, 06:04 Category: System Views: 3570 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: December 7, 2007, 06:12 Category: Emulation Views: 5183 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
Debian

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

Post date: November 5, 2006, 21:11 Category: System Views: 4263 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to install and use xen-tools, xen-shell, and Argo on a Debian system. All three packages provide useful tools for the administration of virtual Xen machines. Xen-tools is a collection of Perl scripts that allow you to easily create, update, and delete Xen guest domains. The xen-shell provides a command-line interface to owners of Xen domains so that they can manage their Xen domains without the help of the server administrator. And with Argo, you can control Xen domains through a web interface or through a menu on the command line.
Ubuntu

How to install GNOME shell on Ubuntu 10.10 desktop edition

Post date: November 4, 2010, 21:11 Category: Desktop Views: 2094 Comments
Tutorial quote: Discover what's new with GNOME Shell (GNOME 3.0) and learn how to install GNOME shell on Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop edition.
RedHat

Tips & tricks: Performance tuning

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 8584 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
Unix+clones

Command your network with Kaboodle

Post date: June 28, 2005, 09:06 Category: Network Views: 2927 Comments
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
Linux

Automating the Login Script

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2480 Comments
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Linux

How the One-Liner For-Loop in Bash Goes

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3381 Comments
Tutorial quote: A mini-guide to one of the coolest tricks at the Bash command line - performing the same operation on a whole group of files at once using the "for-do-done" loop syntax.
Unix+clones

Have a Bash With This Linux Shell

Post date: April 15, 2005, 05:04 Category: Programming Views: 3111 Comments
Tutorial quote: Any Linux administrator who wishes to remain sane relies heavily on scripting to automate routine tasks, customize jobs, and build the plumbing that connects the different utilities that make a Linux system run smoothly. The Linux world is chock-full of scripting languages: Perl, Python, PHP, Scheme, Tcl, Tk, Ruby, Forth, Smalltalk, Eiffel, and doubtless many more. To get the column started, we'll look at shell scripting with Bash, and scripting with Python and Perl.
Linux

Tweakin' your Bash Prompt

Post date: January 6, 2007, 22:01 Category: System Views: 4227 Comments
Tutorial quote: A friendly companion to the Bash-Prompt HOWTO, including a new trick to make the prompt change color dynamically based on your log-in. In the process, the overview could be handy in doing other Bash prompt tricks.
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