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Search results for ASSP With Embedded ClamAV Integrated Into Postfix With Virtual Users And Domains

Debian

How To Combat Viruses Using Your Postfix Configuration

Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: Security Views: 4021 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this guide you will learn how to tweak the HowtoForge mail guide for Postfix (+Auth SMTP + Quota), setup to give better Virus protection.
Debian

Virtualization With Xen On Debian Lenny (AMD64)

Post date: February 8, 2009, 13:02 Category: Installing Views: 3853 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a Debian Lenny (5.0) system (AMD64). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Ubuntu

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu 11.10 With Nginx [ISPConfig 3]

Post date: November 10, 2011, 09:11 Category: Installing Views: 31793 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to prepare an Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot) server with nginx for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3. Since version 3.0.4, ISPConfig comes with full support for the nginx web server in addition to Apache, and this tutorial covers the setup of a server that uses nginx instead of Apache. ISPConfig 3 is a webhosting control panel that allows you to configure the following services through a web browser: nginx and Apache web server, Postfix mail server, MySQL, BIND or MyDNS nameserver, PureFTPd, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and many more.
Debian

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

Post date: March 31, 2011, 09:03 Category: Installing Views: 3612 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 4.0 on a Debian Squeeze (6.0) system (AMD64) and create paravirtualized guests. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Setting Up A Mail Server Using Exim4, Clamav, Dovecot, SpamAssassin On Debian

Post date: September 23, 2010, 11:09 Category: Installing Views: 3494 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto describes one way to build a scalable, secure, full-featured mail platform. It offers virtual hosting of mailboxes in maildir format with support for quotas and server-side filtering, domain aliasing, address aliasing, address forwarding, catchall addresses. Relaying is secured with STARTTLS and SMTP-AUTH. Incoming mails are checked for viruses, spam, and checked against SPF policy and DNSBL.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8562 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones

Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance

Post date: June 25, 2005, 01:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 4912 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many new workstations and servers are coming with integrated gigabit network cards, but quite a few people soon discover that they can't transfer data much faster than they did with 100 Mb/s network cards. Multiple factors can affect your ability to transfer at higher speeds, and most of them revolve around operating system settings. In this article we will discuss the necessary steps to make your new gigabit-enabled server obtain close to gigabit speeds in Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows.
Linux

Building a Virtual Cluster with Xen

Post date: September 28, 2006, 04:09 Category: Emulation Views: 8432 Comments
Tutorial quote: It is a common practice to have development and test servers for each production server, so that you can experiment with changes without the fear of breaking anything important, but this is usually not feasible with clusters. So how do you try that new version of your favorite program before committing it to the production cluster? A cheap and convenient possibility is to build a virtual cluster.

Thanks to the Xen virtual machine monitor, you can create a number of virtual machines, all running simultaneously in your computer, install different operating systems in them, or just different configurations, and connect them via (virtual) network cards. Xen is a terrific tool for building virtual Beowulf clusters. It can prove useful when learning or teaching about clusters or for testing new features/software without the fear of causing major damage to an existing cluster.
Debian

Virtualization With Xen 3.3.1 On Debian Etch

Post date: February 12, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 3215 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 3.3.1 on a Debian Etch (4.0) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware.
Untangle

Spam Blocking And Web Filtering With The Untangle 5.3 Network Gateway

Post date: September 4, 2008, 10:09 Category: Security Views: 8408 Comments
Tutorial quote: Untangle bundles common open-source applications for blocking spam, spyware, viruses, adware and unwanted content on the network in one single Linux distribution. It can be integrated into existing networks either as a router or as a transparent bridge (directly behind the router, but before the switch that connects the client PCs with the router). The best thing about Untangle is that you do not have to reconfigure the client PCs - Untangle works out of the box.
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