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Search results for Add Windows media support to your Linux box

Linux

Add Windows media support to your Linux box

Post date: December 31, 2005, 15:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3172 Comments
Tutorial quote: Having trouble getting .WMV, .WMA, and .ASF files - the Windows-based media formats - to open on your Linux box? Being forced to dual-boot or switch workstations just to listen to or watch audio and video clips is usually more effort than it's worth. But fortunately, if you are using Xine and one of its frontends like Totem, you can add support for these file formats within Linux.
OpenSUSE

Hacking OpenSUSE

Post date: December 3, 2005, 17:12 Category: System Views: 6811 Comments
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
OpenSUSE

Elisa - open Media center, multimedia player for openSUSE Linux

Post date: September 11, 2008, 22:09 Category: Multimedia Views: 4694 Comments
Tutorial quote: Elisa is an open source cross-platform media center connecting the Internet to an all-in-one media player. While primary development and deployment platform is GNU/Linux and Unix operating systems, elisa also currently support Microsoft Windows. Elisa runs on top of the GStreamer multimedia framework. In addition to personal video recorder functionality (PVR) and Music Jukebox support, Elisa will also interoperate with devices following the DLNA standard like Intel’s ViiV systems.
OpenSUSE

SongBird - free iTunes like Media player and web browser

Post date: September 12, 2008, 22:09 Category: Multimedia Views: 3393 Comments
Tutorial quote: Songbird is a free opensource customizable media player and web browse powered by Mozilla. Songbird runs on Mozilla’s XULRunner platform, thus capable of running on Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS X, Solaris and Linux. On the Windows and Macintosh platforms, Songbird utilizes the VideoLAN Client for media playback.
Ubuntu

Newbie-Friendly Post-Installation Ubuntu Usability Setup Guide

Post date: November 5, 2009, 12:11 Category: Desktop Views: 3598 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is designed for new Linux users that are familiar with Microsoft Windows. The goal is to address some of the most common issues that these people face. (Namely, media codecs, and general terminology.) I tried to write it as someone might explain it vocally; I attempted to add humor in an effort to keep it interesting, although I make no guarantees that it is actually funny.
Ubuntu

Installing Xbox Media Center (XBMC) On Ubuntu 8.04

Post date: October 7, 2008, 11:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3789 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Xbox Media Center (XBMC) is a media center application for Linux, Mac, and Windows that allows you to manage/watch/listen to/view your videos, music, and pictures. It has a nice interface, can be controlled from the desktop or a remote control or via its built-in web interface, and it can be extended by custom scripts. This guide shows how you can install XBMC on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop.
Fedora+Core

Mozilla Firebird Plugins

Post date: April 16, 2005, 13:04 Category: Software Views: 3993 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial, I will be showing you how to add:
- Browser pdf viewing support
- Java plugin support
- Flash support
Fedora

Installing Xbox Media Center (XBMC) On Fedora 9 (i386)

Post date: October 21, 2008, 11:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3996 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Xbox Media Center (XBMC) is a media center application for Linux, Mac, and Windows that allows you to manage/watch/listen to/view your videos, music, and pictures. It has a nice interface, can be controlled from the desktop or a remote control or via its built-in web interface, and it can be extended by custom scripts. This guide shows how you can install XBMC on a Fedora 9 desktop (i386).
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 14725 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3642 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
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