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Unix+clones

High Performance MySQL

Post date: December 1, 2006, 04:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 6518 Comments
Tutorial quote: The operating system your MySQL server runs on and the server's configuration can be just as important to your server's performance as the indexes, schema, or queries themselves. In this chapter, we will help you understand how to tune your server to improve performance, as opposed to tuning schema or queries. We'll be looking at changes to your hardware, operating system, and MySQL configuration to see what effects they have on overall performance.

We assume that you've already made efforts to boost the performance of your queries. If you haven't done that already, stop now and read Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 to get a handle on optimizing your queries and your application code. Only then should you worry about server settings. Hardware is often not the solution to MySQL performance problems. Poorly optimized queries can slow you down far more than not having the latest CPU or SCSI disk. To put this in perspective, one of the MySQL AB trainers even says that changing hardware might, in the best cases, give you a 10-fold performance increase. But tuning queries (and schemas) can often give you 1000-fold performance increase. Seriously.

Some topics covered in this chapter are platform-specific. The authors' knowledge of the various platforms on which MySQL runs is limited. In many cases, you'll need to consult your local documentation for various operating system tools and specifics.

We start with an overview of the factors that limit performance and then look more in depth at RAID, hardware, and operating system issues. The chapter finishes with a discussion of techniques you can use to locate, identify, and fix bottlenecks.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8562 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
FreeBSD

How I created my own .mac replacement

Post date: February 7, 2006, 21:02 Category: Network Views: 4175 Comments
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink