Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With Ghost4Linux

Linux

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With Ghost4Linux

Post date: January 11, 2007, 19:01 Category: System Views: 4037 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with Ghost4Linux. Ghost4Linux is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and transferred to an FTP server instead of cloning locally.
CloneZilla

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With CloneZilla Live

Post date: November 30, 2008, 13:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 10089 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with CloneZilla Live. CloneZilla Live is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and can be transferred to a Samba-, SSH-, or NFS server or to a local hard drive or USB drive.
Ubuntu

How To Use NTFS Drives/Partitions Under Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Post date: January 7, 2007, 21:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3444 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions. It covers the usage of internal NTFS partitions (e.g. in a dual-boot environment) and of external USB NTFS drives.
Linux

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Post date: January 28, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 4485 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system. On the clients minimal to no configuration is needed. BackupPC supports full and incremental backups, and it comes with a neat web frontend for the administrator and normal user so that backups and recoveries can be managed through a web browser. It should be noted, however, that BackupPC does file-based backups, not bit-wise backups like Ghost4Linux, for example, so it is not made for disk/partition imaging.
Linux

Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump

Post date: November 25, 2008, 11:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3821 Comments
Tutorial quote: vzdump is a backup and restore utility for OpenVZ VMs. This tutorial shows how you can use it to clone/back up/restore virtual machines with vzdump.
Linux

Backup and Restore Linux Partitions Using Partimage

Post date: January 22, 2007, 18:01 Category: Installing Views: 3010 Comments
Tutorial quote: Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX utility which saves partitions in many formats (see below) to an image file. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable floppies (ZIP for example), … Partitions can be saved across the network since version 0.6.0.When using Partimage, the partitions must be unmounted.
Linux

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

Post date: January 23, 2007, 23:01 Category: System Views: 3773 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).
Ubuntu

Back In Time – A Simple backup tool for ubuntu

Post date: July 15, 2009, 21:07 Category: Software Views: 4612 Comments
Tutorial quote: Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from “flyback project” and “TimeVault”.The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.Keep in mind that Back In Time is just a GUI. The real magic is done by rsync (take snapshots and restore), diff (check if somethind changed) and cp (make hardlinks).
Linux

How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data

Post date: January 9, 2007, 20:01 Category: System Views: 4840 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is about resizing ext3 partitions without losing data. It shows how to shrink and enlarge existing ext3 partitions and how to merge two ext3 partitions. This can be quite useful if you do not use LVM and you realize that your existing partitioning does not meet your actual needs anymore.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2962 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink