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Unix+clones

How to restore a hacked Linux server

Post date: July 30, 2006, 18:07 Category: Security Views: 3717 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every sysadmin will try its best to secure the system/s he is managing. Hopefully you never had to restore your own system from a compromise and you will not have to do this in the future. Working on several projects to restore a compromised Linux system for various clients, I have developed a set of rules that others might find useful in similar situations. The type of hacks encountered can be very variate and you might see very different ones than the one I will present, or I have seen live, but even so, this rules might be used as a starting point to develop your own recovery plan.
Fedora

How To Use NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Fedora 7

Post date: August 22, 2007, 22:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3068 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to use ntfs-3g on a Fedora 7 desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Ubuntu

How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 9, 2007, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3423 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Mandriva

How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Mandriva 2007 Spring

Post date: September 3, 2007, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3573 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on a Mandriva 2007 Spring desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Ubuntu

Recover your deleted jpeg pictures from filesystem or camera memory card - recoverjpeg

Post date: October 10, 2010, 05:10 Category: Desktop Views: 2354 Comments
Tutorial quote: Deleted or lost files can usually be recovered from failed or formatted drives and partitions, CD-ROMs and memory cards using the free software available in the Ubuntu repositories. The data is recoverable because the information is not immediately removed from the disk.
Linux

Tools to access Linux Partitions from Windows

Post date: April 13, 2008, 20:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3431 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you dual boot with Windows and Linux, and have data spread across different partitions on Linux and Windows, you should be really in for some issues.

It happens sometimes you need to access your files on Linux partitions from Windows, and you realize it isn’t possible easily. Not really, with these tools in hand - it’s very easy for you to access files on your Linux partitions from Windows.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 2523 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Ubuntu

Creating Backups With Back In Time On An Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop

Post date: August 25, 2009, 11:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2399 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to install and use Back In Time on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop. Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from "flyback project" and "TimeVault". The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.
Linux

Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 3083 Comments
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
Ubuntu

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running System (Ubuntu 10.04)

Post date: July 6, 2010, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 2488 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running Ubuntu 10.04 system. The GRUB2 bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).
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