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Linux

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Post date: January 28, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 4431 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system. On the clients minimal to no configuration is needed. BackupPC supports full and incremental backups, and it comes with a neat web frontend for the administrator and normal user so that backups and recoveries can be managed through a web browser. It should be noted, however, that BackupPC does file-based backups, not bit-wise backups like Ghost4Linux, for example, so it is not made for disk/partition imaging.
Debian

BackupPC Installation And Configuration

Post date: June 19, 2006, 15:06 Category: Software Views: 3103 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackupPC is a high-performance, enterprise-grade system for backing up Linux and WinXX PCs and laptops to a server's disk. BackupPC is highly configurable and easy to install and maintain.
Ubuntu

Installing Oracle VM VirtualBox on Ubuntu

Post date: October 10, 2010, 05:10 Category: Software Views: 3928 Comments
Tutorial quote: What does that mean? For one thing, VirtualBox installs on your existing Intel or AMD-based computers, whether they are running Windows, Mac, Linux or Solaris operating systems. Secondly, VirtualBox extends the capabilities of your existing computer so that VirtualBox can run multiple operating systems (inside multiple virtual machines) at the same time. So, for example, you can run Windows and Linux on your Mac, run Windows Server 2008 on your Linux server, run Linux on your Windows PC, and so on, all alongside your existing applications. You can install and run as many virtual machines as you like -- the only practical limits are disk space and memory.
Ubuntu

Creating Backups With Back In Time On An Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop

Post date: August 25, 2009, 11:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2377 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to install and use Back In Time on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop. Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from "flyback project" and "TimeVault". The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.
Fedora

How To Use NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Fedora 7

Post date: August 22, 2007, 22:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3041 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to use ntfs-3g on a Fedora 7 desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Linux+Mint

Changing From Microsoft Windows To Linux Mint 11

Post date: August 12, 2011, 08:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3391 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a tutorial for people originally using the Windows Operating System who want to try out Linux Mint 11. It is supposed to show the differences and similarities between the two systems and depict Linux' functions with examples.
Linux

Grub From the Ground Up

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Software Views: 2690 Comments
Tutorial quote: Grub is a world-class boot loader with insufficient documentation. In many ways it blows the doors of LILO. For instance, it's MUCH easier to use Knoppix to rebuild a grub boot loader than to rebuild a LILO boot loader. However, until you're comfortable with grub, it might seem just the opposite. All too often grub dumps you at a grub> prompt with no hint of what you should do. You might have heard that a successful reboot is just three commands away, but which commands? The state of grub's documentation is such that you can't figure it out unless you already know grub.

That catch 22 is the very purpose of this document. This document will to give you enough grub expertise that you can create a grub boot floppy on a working machine with grub installed (not necessarily as the bootloader, just installed), and use that floppy to bust back into a Linux machine with a blown bootloader, and then use that floppy to actually install grub as the bootloader.

This document does not discuss using grub to boot or dual boot Windows, mach, BSD, or other non-Linux operating systems. I might write on that subject later. But in the meantime, once you're familiar with the principles and practices of grub, given some study of existing documentation you'll probably be able to use grub to boot non-Linux operating systems.
Ubuntu

How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 9, 2007, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3395 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Mandriva

How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Mandriva 2007 Spring

Post date: September 3, 2007, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3541 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on a Mandriva 2007 Spring desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Ubuntu

How To Use NTFS Drives/Partitions Under Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Post date: January 7, 2007, 21:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3411 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions. It covers the usage of internal NTFS partitions (e.g. in a dual-boot environment) and of external USB NTFS drives.
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