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Search results for Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Windows

Three Ways To Access Linux Partitions (ext2/ext3) From Windows On Dual-Boot Systems

Post date: January 20, 2008, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6505 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have a dual-boot Windows/Linux system, you probably know this problem: you can access files from your Windows installation while you are in Linux, but not the other way round. This tutorial shows three ways how you can access your Linux partitions (with ext2 or ext3 filesystem) from within Windows: Explore2fs, DiskInternals Linux Reader, and the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows. While the first two provide read-only access, the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows can be used for read and write operations.
Ubuntu

Back In Time – A Simple backup tool for ubuntu

Post date: July 15, 2009, 21:07 Category: Software Views: 4608 Comments
Tutorial quote: Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from “flyback project” and “TimeVault”.The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.Keep in mind that Back In Time is just a GUI. The real magic is done by rsync (take snapshots and restore), diff (check if somethind changed) and cp (make hardlinks).
Ubuntu

Virus Protection With AVG Antivirus On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 10, 2007, 22:09 Category: Security Views: 3897 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use AVG Antivirus on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop. Although there are not many Linux viruses out there, this can be useful if you often exchange files with Windows users - it can help you to not pass on any Windows viruses (that do not do any harm to Linux systems) to Windows users. AVG Antivirus for Linux is free for private and non-commercial use.
Ubuntu

Virus Protection With F-PROT Antivirus On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 24, 2007, 08:09 Category: Security Views: 3784 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use F-PROT Antivirus on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop. Although there are not many Linux viruses out there, this can be useful if you often exchange files with Windows users - it can help you to not pass on any Windows viruses (that do not do any harm to Linux systems) to Windows users. F-PROT Antivirus for Linux is free for home use.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 2540 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Ubuntu

How To: Back up your DVDs in Ubuntu

Post date: April 10, 2006, 03:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 4347 Comments
Tutorial quote: I previously posted a script which’ll back up DVDs in Ubuntu. One of the commenters recommended k9copy, and having taken a look at it I recommend it thoroughly.
Debian

Cloning Linux Systems With CloneZilla Server Edition (CloneZilla SE)

Post date: January 22, 2009, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 31027 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can clone Linux systems with CloneZilla SE. This is useful for copying one Linux installation to multiple computers without losing much time, e.g. in a classroom, or also for creating an image-based backup of a system. I will install CloneZilla SE on a Debian Etch server in this tutorial. The systems that you want to clone can use whatever Linux distribution you prefer.
Linux

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With Ghost4Linux

Post date: January 11, 2007, 19:01 Category: System Views: 4031 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with Ghost4Linux. Ghost4Linux is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and transferred to an FTP server instead of cloning locally.
Unix+clones

Learn REXX fast

Post date: September 1, 2005, 01:09 Category: Programming Views: 3267 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you’ve programmed under IBM operating systems, you’ve undoubtedly heard of Rexx. Rexx is the scripting and command language IBM bundles with all its mainframe, mid-range, and lower-end operating systems. What you might not be aware of is that Rexx also runs on almost every other operating system in the known universe. You can download Rexx free for all versions of Windows®, Linux, UNIX®, BSD, Mac OS, and DOS, and many other systems. It even runs on the three major operating systems for handheld devices: Windows CE, Palm OS, and Symbian/EPOC32.

What this means is, if you learn Rexx, you’ll know a scripting language that runs everywhere from mainframes to handhelds—and everything in between. Rexx is a general-purpose language that's powerful enough for mainframes yet flexible enough for other platforms. Best of all, Rexx is easy to learn.
Linux

Adding Windows Fonts in Linux

Post date: December 3, 2005, 07:12 Category: Desktop Views: 2572 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike past times, Linux do come with good fonts. And the font rendering can be made better by choosing to antialiase the fonts. But at times you come across a website which has been designed with the windows user in mind. Such websites are best viewed with one of the windows fonts. If you have windows OS installed on your machine, you can copy the essential fonts from the windows partition to linux and use them to get a better web experience. Here is how you do it.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink