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Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4317 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Windows

Convert Physical Windows Systems Into Virtual Machines To Be Run On A Linux Desktop

Post date: February 20, 2007, 19:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 7889 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can convert a physical Windows system (XP, 2003, 2000, NT4 SP4+) into a VMware virtual machine with the free VMware Converter Starter. The resulting virtual machine can be run in the free VMware Player and VMware Server, and also in VMware Workstation and other VMware products. VMware Converter comes in handy if you want to switch to a Linux desktop, but feel the need to run your old Windows desktop from time to time. By converting your Windows desktop into a virtual machine, you can run it under VMware Server/Player, etc. on your Linux desktop.
OpenSUSE

Elisa - open Media center, multimedia player for openSUSE Linux

Post date: September 11, 2008, 22:09 Category: Multimedia Views: 4590 Comments
Tutorial quote: Elisa is an open source cross-platform media center connecting the Internet to an all-in-one media player. While primary development and deployment platform is GNU/Linux and Unix operating systems, elisa also currently support Microsoft Windows. Elisa runs on top of the GStreamer multimedia framework. In addition to personal video recorder functionality (PVR) and Music Jukebox support, Elisa will also interoperate with devices following the DLNA standard like Intel’s ViiV systems.
CloneZilla

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With CloneZilla Live

Post date: November 30, 2008, 13:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 10015 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with CloneZilla Live. CloneZilla Live is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and can be transferred to a Samba-, SSH-, or NFS server or to a local hard drive or USB drive.
Linux

Tools to access Linux Partitions from Windows

Post date: April 13, 2008, 20:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3407 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you dual boot with Windows and Linux, and have data spread across different partitions on Linux and Windows, you should be really in for some issues.

It happens sometimes you need to access your files on Linux partitions from Windows, and you realize it isn’t possible easily. Not really, with these tools in hand - it’s very easy for you to access files on your Linux partitions from Windows.
Fedora

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Post date: March 8, 2009, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 3903 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V). Hardware virtualization allows you to install unmodified guest systems (in contrast to paravirtualization where the guest kernel needs to be modified); that way you cannot only virtualize OpenSource operating systems like Linux and BSD, but also closed-source operating systems like Windows where you cannot modify the kernel.
Unix+clones

Reset your Settings for any Program

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: Desktop Views: 2961 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever messed with settings and majorly screwed something up? I have.

Yesterday I was trying to pull a stunt by trying to embed Konsole in my KDE desktop and when I restarted the X server I had no desktop icons and couldn’t even get back to my settings to change it back! I was thinking OMG, RRR (Repartition, Reformat, Reinstall) time.

But wait, what if I just clear out my settings? Kind of a crude way of doing it, but it worked.
Linux

How to install Linux on Windows using VirtualBox

Post date: August 12, 2008, 14:08 Category: Installing Views: 3058 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to install Linux and specifically Ubuntu Linux on Windows XP using SUN's VirtualBox. VirtualBox creates a virtual hard drive in which you can install another guest Operating System (Ubuntu Linux) which you can run along with your host Operating System (Windows XP). This way you can try Linux without being afraid of losing your Windows files.
Unix+clones

How to scan your Linux-Distro for Root Kits

Post date: May 19, 2006, 18:05 Category: Security Views: 3176 Comments
Tutorial quote: Do you suspect that you have a compromised system ?
Check now for root kits that the intruder may have installed !!!

So... What in the hell is a root kit ???
A root kit is a collection of programs that intruders often install after they have compromised the root account of a system.
These programs will help the intruders clean up their tracks, as well as provide access back into the system.
Root kits will sometimes leave processes running so that the intruder can come back easily and without the system administrator's knowledge !

Solution....
Scripts like chkrootkit will do the job for you automatically.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2696 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
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