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Search results for Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 10.10 Server

Post date: November 30, 2010, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2592 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 10.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.04 Server

Post date: May 10, 2011, 11:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2541 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.04 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 8.10 Server

Post date: March 10, 2009, 12:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4067 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 8.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.10 Server

Post date: November 27, 2011, 11:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 27491 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tools that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.10 KVM server.
Unix+clones

Teach Yourself Perl 5 in 21 days

Post date: November 24, 2005, 20:11 Category: Programming Views: 4332 Comments
Tutorial quote: No previous programming experience is required for you to learn everything you need to know about programming with Perl from this book. In particular, no knowledge of the C programming language is required. If you are familiar with other programming languages, learning Perl will be a snap. The only assumption this book does make is that you are familiar with the basics of using the UNIX operating system.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: April 28, 2008, 17:04 Category: System Views: 6035 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?

Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution.
Ubuntu

Database Server With postgresql and pgadmin3 in Ubuntu

Post date: April 20, 2008, 18:04 Category: Software Views: 3523 Comments
Tutorial quote: PostgreSQL is a powerful, open source relational database system. It has more than 15 years of active development and a proven architecture that has earned it a strong reputation for reliability, data integrity, and correctness. It runs on all major operating systems, including Linux, UNIX (AIX, BSD,HP-UX, SGI IRIX, Mac OS X, Solaris, Tru64), and Windows. It is fully ACID compliant, has full support for foreign keys, joins, views, triggers, and stored procedures (in multiple languages). It includes
most SQL92 and SQL99 data types, including INTEGER, NUMERIC, BOOLEAN, CHAR, VARCHAR, DATE, INTERVAL, and
TIMESTAMP. It also supports storage of binary large objects, including pictures, sounds, or video. It has native programming interfaces for C/C++, Java, .Net, Perl, Python, Ruby, Tcl, ODBC, among others.

Ubuntu

How To Install OpenOffice.org 3.0.0 On Ubuntu 8.04

Post date: October 19, 2008, 10:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3545 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can install the new OpenOffice 3.0.0 office suite on your Ubuntu 8.04 desktop. Your current OpenOffice installation will not be removed unless you uninstall it with Synaptic or on the command line, so you can run both versions in parallel if you like.

http://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-install-openoffice-3.0.0-on-ubuntu-8.04
SuSe

gDesklets - Desklets for your Desktop in openSUSE

Post date: August 3, 2008, 13:08 Category: Desktop Views: 5976 Comments
Tutorial quote: gDesklets is another great tool like Google Gadgets for bringing mini programs called desklets such as weather forecasts, news tickers, system information displays, or music player controls, onto your desktop, where they are sitting there in a symbiotic relationship of eye candy and usefulness. The possibilities are really endless and they are always there to serve you whenever you need them, just one key-press away. The system is not restricted to one desktop environment, but currently works on most of the modern Unix desktops (including GNOME, KDE, Xfce).
RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6089 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
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