Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Linux

shred - Securely delete files in Linux

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Security Views: 4174 Comments
Tutorial quote: In case you want to delete some confidential data from your computer just to make sure that it is no longer accessible to anyone, then do not delete the file using the regular rm command because there will still remain a chance that someone might use a software to recover your deleted data before the specific storage area is overwritten by new data. The proper way to permanently dispose of such data in Linux is the shred command.
OpenSUSE

Byzanz - free opensource Desktop Recording (command-line) tool

Post date: October 11, 2008, 22:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3521 Comments
Tutorial quote: Byzanz is a free opensource GNOME based Command-Line utility to capture desktop recording software for linux. This should probably be the coolest command-line utility that I have seen in recent days. Byzanz records your desktop session to an animated GIF. You can record your entire screen, a single window, an arbitrary region or even follow the cursor. Given that it is only a GIF format makes it even more an interesting proposition as the file size is going to be very small.
Unix+clones

Screen: an introduction and beginner's tutorial

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Software Views: 2537 Comments
Tutorial quote: Most modern Unix-based operating systems (e.g. Linux, MacOS X, and BSD) come with a little console-mode utility called GNU Screen. It's a powerful tool in the hands of the console warrior, a veritable Swiss Army knife of text-mode human-computer interaction.

This utility, despite its considerable usefulness, goes unused by a great many people. Why is this? Few people even know it's there, and those that do rarely understand the problem it solves. In this article, I will explain what screen does for you, and provide a simple set of instructions for accomplishing basic tasks using screen. My audience is those that are skilled with the command line but who have little or no experience with screen itself.
Unix+clones

Do everything right from the command line

Post date: September 7, 2006, 14:09 Category: Network Views: 3949 Comments
Tutorial quote: Discover three essential UNIX® utilities that deliver the entire Internet to your command line.
Unix+clones

Command-line calculations using bc

Post date: November 29, 2006, 01:11 Category: Software Views: 4614 Comments
Tutorial quote: If like me, you do most of your work from the command-line, using vim to edit files, mutt for e-mails, cd/ls/mv/find/etc instead of a file manager, then you may get annoyed by having to fire up a GUI calculator to make (what may sometimes be) a single calculation.

One useful feature of calculating on the command-line is that you can see what you've typed. For instance, sometimes when I'm entering a long, complex calculation on a calculator (either the GUI or the solid, hold-in-your-hand type), I sometimes forget if I've actually typed in all those numbers or made the calculations in the right order. Maybe it's just me ...
Debian

Little-known APT utilities for Debian desktop users

Post date: July 30, 2006, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2641 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) is a distinguishing feature of Debian-based systems. APT was the first major alternative in GNU/Linux to boast automatic dependency resolution. Most GNU/Linux users know it through the apt-get command, a utility that calls on the lower-level dpkg command. However, other APT-based utilities remain largely unknown to desktop users. Some of these utilities offer a range of functionality far beyond those of the basic tools.
Linux

How to create System Image

Post date: November 17, 2008, 11:11 Category: System Views: 3385 Comments
Tutorial quote: Suppose you have a 40GB hard disk and a removable hard disk whose capacity is 60GB, and you want to backup all the files from the hard disk to the removable disk. With "dd", it is a very easy task. Again, suppose your hard disk's Unix device name is /dev/sda and the removable disk is /dev/sdb. The following command can copy all the content from /dev/sda to /dev/sdb:
OpenSUSE

cutmp3 - Command Line MP3 Editor in openSUSE

Post date: May 14, 2009, 22:05 Category: Multimedia Views: 4737 Comments
Tutorial quote: cutmp3, as the name implies is a simple command line tool to edit and cut MP3 files without loosing any quality. cutmp3 can edit the mp3 files interactively or selection (start time and end time) can be provided from the command line or even better can be used with a timetable fiile specifiying different start/end times from the same MP3 files.
OSX

Recover a dead hard drive using dd

Post date: October 23, 2006, 03:10 Category: System Views: 15382 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Unix program dd is a disk copying util that you can use at the command line in order to make a disk image. It makes a bit-by-bit copy of the drive it's copying, caring nothing about filesystem type, files, or anything else. It's a great way to workaround the need for Norton Ghost.

Normally, in order to make a disk image, the disk you're copying from has to be able to spin up and talk -- in other words, it's OK to make a copy if the disk is healthy. But what happens when your disk is becoming a doorstop? As long as it continues to spin, even with physical damage on the drive, dd and Mac OS X will get you out of the fire.
Linux

Arcane Linux Commands: dc

Post date: December 31, 2007, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3454 Comments
Tutorial quote: If anybody within earshot of you is struggling to learn sed and ever remarks "This is like learning Klingon! Could they make it any more cryptic?", you can always point them to dc.

dc is the command-line Unix "Reverse-Polish Notation"(RPN) calculator. The name stands for "desktop calculator". OK, so what is a Polish calculator and why would you want to reverse one? The math that you do in school uses infix notation, with the operator between the numbers (3 + 5). Prefix notation puts the operator first (+ 3 5) and is what the Lisp language uses. The prefix notation is known as "Polish notation" after the nationality of Jan Łukasiewicz who invented it. Postfix notation, then, has the operator at the rear (3 5 +), and so is also the reverse of Polish notation.

What's the difference? In computer programming, you have to specify what order you want a multi-part calculation to be in. Everybody is familiar with the old problem of A*B-C. For A=5, B=3, C=2, multiplying first and subtracting second gives you 13, while subtracting first and multiplying second gives you 5. To specify which operations you want performed first, you have to either memorize the complex orders of operations (which change from one language to the next) or use a lot of parenthesis ((A*B)-C) or (A*(B-C)). Hey, that's what everybody complains about in all those languages that use parenthesis!
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink