Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Fedora+Core

Set Up A Fedora 7 Mail Server Using Qmail Toaster

Post date: June 20, 2007, 23:06 Category: Installing Views: 8084 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Fedora 7 mail server based on Qmail using Qmail Toaster. Qmail is an Internet Mail Transfer Agent (MTA) for UNIX-like operating systems. It is a drop-in replacement for the Sendmail system provided with UNIX operating systems. Qmail uses the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) to exchange messages with MTAs on other systems.
Linux

Introduction to Linux files

Post date: April 12, 2005, 16:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2432 Comments
Tutorial quote: This newbie-level Linux tutorial is an introduction to handling files from the Linux command line. It will cover finding files, determining their type, renaming, copying, examining their attributes, reading their contents, and, in the case of binary files, how to get clues to learn something more about them. Further reading will be suggested for editing files since that topic is beyond the scope of this article.
OpenSUSE

Tomboy - Desktop Note Taking in openSUSE Linux

Post date: August 31, 2008, 18:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3236 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tomboy is a desktop note-taking application for Linux and Unix. Simple and easy to use, but with potential to help you organize the ideas and information you deal with every day. Tomboy is written in C# and utilizes the Mono runtime and Gtk#. Automatic spell-checking is provided by GtkSpell.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3366 Comments
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Ubuntu

Disk ARchive (Backup and Restore) using dar and kdar(dar Frontend)

Post date: January 12, 2007, 18:01 Category: System Views: 3634 Comments
Tutorial quote: Dar is a shell command that makes backup of a directory tree and files. Its features include splitting archives over several files, CDs, ZIPs, or floppies, compression, full or differential backups, strong encryption, proper saving and restoration of hard links and extended attributes, remote backup using pipes and external command (such as ssh), and rearrangement of the “slices” of an existing archive. It can now run commands between slices, encrypt archives, and quickly retrieve individual files from differential and full backups. Dar also has external GUI like kdar for Linux,thanks to the well documented API.
Debian

Burning DVDs on Debian for Newbies

Post date: December 23, 2005, 00:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3103 Comments
Tutorial quote: DVD writers have become so common these days that there is hardly any difference between the price of a CD-writer drive and a DVD-writer drive. So I'm assuming that almost everyone would be buying a DVD writer drive these days. Below are a few tips for newbies on how to burn DVDs on a Debian box using the command line. Other GUI tools like k3b, nautilus burner, etc exists but its always fun to know how to do that stuff from command line.
Linux

Backup and Restore Linux Partitions Using Partimage

Post date: January 22, 2007, 18:01 Category: Installing Views: 2982 Comments
Tutorial quote: Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX utility which saves partitions in many formats (see below) to an image file. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable floppies (ZIP for example), … Partitions can be saved across the network since version 0.6.0.When using Partimage, the partitions must be unmounted.
Linux

Breaking the SHELL

Post date: May 29, 2005, 01:05 Category: Programming Views: 3211 Comments
Tutorial quote: Shell scripts are a part and parcel of almost all software applications running on UNIX, and the use simply spans from a trivial script, managing automatic database backup to bunch of scripts collaboratively doing complex operation on regular expressions.

Though it's a mere design decision to partition modules between scripts and programming language, but I personally feel that they sometimes come very handy saving lot of time and lines of code, when compared to implementing the same functionality in the programming language in context.And in fact with some exceptions, complexity of a shell script can scale to that of codes in C language. Add to this the power of all those numerous UNIX commands, and just think through, what can be achieved by shell scripts.
Here I will discuss few topics mainly relevant to intermediate shell programmers
Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4361 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
OpenSUSE

xclip - Copy contents from command line to X clipboard in openSUSE

Post date: April 14, 2009, 06:04 Category: Desktop Views: 3362 Comments
Tutorial quote: xclip is a command line interface to the X11 selections (X11 clipboard). It can also be used for copying files, as an alternative to sftp/scp, thus avoiding password prompts when X11 forwarding has already been setup. xclip reads from Standard Input or from one or more files and copy it to the X11 clipboard making it available to the X applications. xclip can also print the content of the current X clipboard onto the standard output or to a file.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink