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Linux

Five X Windows Background Hacks You Probably Didn't Know

Post date: September 26, 2007, 09:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3406 Comments
Tutorial quote: Command lines to do amazing things to your desktop background, when you get tired of wallpaper. Includes animated and static backgrounds using fbsetroot, bggen, ImageMagick, xaos, xlock, and xscreensaver.
Unix+clones

Command your network with Kaboodle

Post date: June 28, 2005, 09:06 Category: Network Views: 2904 Comments
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
Fedora

Multimedia Support in Fedora 11

Post date: June 27, 2009, 09:06 Category: Multimedia Views: 4630 Comments
Tutorial quote: Follow these instructions to get mp3 and other multimedia support on your Fedora 11.
Open a terminal and become root, then run this command:
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3385 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Unix+clones

Writing Shell Scripts

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Programming Views: 3736 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the thousands of commands available for the command line user, how can you remember them all? The answer is, you don't. The real power of the computer is its ability to do the work for you. To get it to do that, we use the power of the shell to automate things. We write scripts.
FreeBSD

Using FreeBSD's ACLs

Post date: September 29, 2005, 17:09 Category: Security Views: 3434 Comments
Tutorial quote: Five years ago (gee, has it really been that long?), I wrote a series of articles on understanding Unix permissions. Since then, FreeBSD has implemented something known as ACLs (Access Control Lists).

ACLs came to BSD as part of the TrustedBSD project. As the name suggests, they give a user finer access control over permissions.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3060 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
FreeBSD

FreeBSD Networking Basics

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3549 Comments
Tutorial quote: Beginners to Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD are often stymied by their network settings. Sure, the install process may have set up your NIC for you, but where do you go to view these settings, and how do you proceed if your NIC stops working? Since networking is such an integral part of computing, this article will demonstrate how to verify, configure, and optimize your network settings.
Linux

Lynis - Security and system auditing tool

Post date: March 4, 2008, 22:03 Category: Security Views: 3668 Comments
Tutorial quote: Lynis is an auditing tool which tests and gathers information from Unix based systems. The audience for this tool are security and system auditors, network specialists and system maintainers.
Debian

ACL(Access Control List) Configuration

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3068 Comments
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
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