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Search results for Backing up your files with rsync

Unix+clones

Backing up your files with rsync

Post date: October 14, 2007, 15:10 Category: Network Views: 3669 Comments
Tutorial quote: Backing up files on a regular basis is an integral part of administering your server.

One way is to download each and every file when you want to save them. However, rsync makes the task a lot easier as it only downloads files that have changed - saving time and bandwidth.
OSX

How To Backup Your Mac Intelligently

Post date: May 26, 2006, 07:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6049 Comments
Tutorial quote: I’m a paranoid person when it comes to backing up my files, but it took a hard drive crash of my own to make me realize how important backing up can be. Since then, I’ve gotten very good at making sure my data is secure. The setup I’m about to describe works for me. It’s based on how I prioritize my data and on the budget I’m willing to spend to keep everything safe. It’s not perfect for everyone, so take what I say with a grain of salt - an example of where to start and what’s possible.
OpenSUSE

Krsync - A Kommander based GUI frontend for rsync

Post date: January 11, 2009, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 3603 Comments
Tutorial quote: Krsync is a simple GUI frontend for the famous rsync to synchronize files and directories between systems or even two different directories on the same server. Krsync is a Kommander based GUI for rsync.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 9.04

Post date: July 27, 2009, 10:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2062 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: March 11, 2008, 10:03 Category: Desktop Views: 2782 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Unix+clones

Create Incremental Snapshot-style Backups With rSync And SSH

Post date: August 29, 2006, 16:08 Category: Network Views: 3188 Comments
Tutorial quote: As neither human nor computers are perfect (humans err / computers may fail) it is quite obvious that a good backup system will prevent from too much damage once the computer may go down. This could be either because the harddrive is failing or because of hackers or because you accidentally deleted something important.

In this tutorial I will show you how to automate backups automatically in an incremental snapshot-style way by using rSync.
Ubuntu

QuickStart, The Swiss Army Knife For Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop

Post date: August 17, 2008, 10:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3223 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this article I will show how to install and use QuickStart on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop. QuickStart is like a Swiss army knife, it allows you to do various things on your Ubuntu desktop: creating and restoring backups, running scheduled backups, backing up configuration files, installing some common applications, installing DVD codecs, deleting unnecessary files, etc.
Unix+clones

Using network transfer protocols

Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 2174 Comments
Tutorial quote: Let's face it, most of us are in a rut when it comes to moving our files around. We learned how to use a simple FTP client years ago, and maybe even updated to a GUI FTP client when we were feeling particularly adventurous. There are actually a wealth of tools available for transferring files, and some of them perform automation functions that can easily assist your business in building site mirrors, synchronizing directory contents, and more.

Keep in mind that for many of the tools covered here, there's only really room to skim through their features. Some, such as wget and rsync, are full of useful capabilities for those brave enough to read their man pages and experiment.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3354 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2738 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
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