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Search results for Benchmarking BSD and Linux

BSD

Set Up PC-BSD v1.4 beta

Post date: September 1, 2007, 01:09 Category: Desktop Views: 6423 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.4 beta. PC-BSD is released under the BSD license. PC-BSD is a desktop operating system based on FreeBSD. It uses KDE as its desktop environment.
Unix+clones

Benchmarking BSD and Linux

Post date: June 18, 2005, 22:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3613 Comments
Tutorial quote: These benchmarks are the result of my scalable network programming research. My interest in this area is to see how scalable and fast network applications can be on standard PC hardware.

I have done most of my research on Linux 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 kernels using a home-grown distribution I affectionately call "Leanux". I have experimented with several APIs and methods to try and get the most scalability and performance out of a web server. The ultimate goal, however, is to demonstrate scalability by surviving a Slashdotting.
PC-BSD

The Perfect Desktop - PC-BSD 1.5

Post date: March 20, 2008, 12:03 Category: Desktop Views: 8112 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.5. This release is based upon FreeBSD 6.3 and uses KDE 3.5.8 as default desktop environment. Taken from the PC-BSD page: PC-BSD is a complete desktop operating system, which has been designed with the "casual" computer user in mind. It offers the stability and security that only a BSD-based operating system can bring, while as the same time providing a comfortable user experience, allowing you to get the most out of your computing time. With PC-BSD you can spend less time working to fix viruses or spyware and instead have the computer work for you.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2912 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
BSD

Managing Filesystems : fstab

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 6538 Comments
Tutorial quote: Understanding how the BSD filesystem manages disk space is critical to successfully managing a BSD server or workstation. However, this topic is generally overlooked since it is rarely used outside of installation and upgrades. It is also a very simple topic and most people assume you understand how it all works.

This article gives a quick synopsis on filesystem layout and tries to briefly explain how to understand /etc/fstab. The fstab(5) man pages, while good, do little to teach the basics to new sysadmins.
Linux

Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2982 Comments
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Unix+clones

Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0

Post date: April 21, 2005, 10:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2976 Comments
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
PC-BSD

Creating PC-BSD Packages (.pbi's)

Post date: September 1, 2005, 02:09 Category: Software Views: 5840 Comments
Tutorial quote: I've found a neat, clean and fast way of creating PBI's that works 100%. and im writing this HOW-TO to explain it.
Debian

Installing And Using The Unbound Name Server On Debian Etch

Post date: May 29, 2008, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 3883 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unbound is a validating, recursive, and caching DNS resolver, released under a BSD license. Version 1.0.0 was released on May 20, 2008. This tutorial explains how to install and use it on Debian Etch, including the creation of zones for your own domains.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4671 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
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