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Unix+clones

A web server in a shell script

Post date: March 14, 2006, 08:03 Category: Programming Views: 16464 Comments
Tutorial quote: Suppose you want to experiment a little with web pages and CGI's, but you don't want the hassle of installing the full Apache package. This quick and dirty shell script could just be what you need.

Put simply, a web server is an application that sends local text files over the network to the clients that request them. If you let another program (for example inetd) deal with the network part, the web server could be reduced to a mere cat "$filename" to stdout. Of course, the difficult part would be to extract that filename out of the HTTP request string: nothing that a Bash script cannot easily do!
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3601 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Fedora

How To Harden PHP5 With Suhosin On Fedora 7

Post date: July 25, 2007, 23:07 Category: Security Views: 3241 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to harden PHP5 with Suhosin on a Fedora 7 server. From the Suhosin project page: "Suhosin is an advanced protection system for PHP installations that was designed to protect servers and users from known and unknown flaws in PHP applications and the PHP core. Suhosin comes in two independent parts, that can be used separately or in combination. The first part is a small patch against the PHP core, that implements a few low-level protections against bufferoverflows or format string vulnerabilities and the second part is a powerful PHP extension that implements all the other protections."
CentOS

How To Harden PHP5 With Suhosin On CentOS 5.0

Post date: August 3, 2007, 22:08 Category: Security Views: 3727 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to harden PHP5 with Suhosin on a CentOS 5.0 server. From the Suhosin project page: "Suhosin is an advanced protection system for PHP installations that was designed to protect servers and users from known and unknown flaws in PHP applications and the PHP core. Suhosin comes in two independent parts, that can be used separately or in combination. The first part is a small patch against the PHP core, that implements a few low-level protections against bufferoverflows or format string vulnerabilities and the second part is a powerful PHP extension that implements all the other protections."
Debian

Restricting Users To SFTP Plus Setting Up Chrooted SSH/SFTP (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: September 6, 2011, 07:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5224 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to give users chrooted SSH and/or chrooted SFTP access on Debian Squeeze. With this setup, you can give your users shell access without having to fear that they can see your whole system. Your users will be jailed in a specific directory which they will not be able to break out of. I will also show how to restrict users to SFTP so that they cannot use SSH (this part is independent from the chroot part of this tutorial).
Debian

Debian RAID 1/5 system installer

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3087 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
BSD

Managing Filesystems : fstab

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 6543 Comments
Tutorial quote: Understanding how the BSD filesystem manages disk space is critical to successfully managing a BSD server or workstation. However, this topic is generally overlooked since it is rarely used outside of installation and upgrades. It is also a very simple topic and most people assume you understand how it all works.

This article gives a quick synopsis on filesystem layout and tries to briefly explain how to understand /etc/fstab. The fstab(5) man pages, while good, do little to teach the basics to new sysadmins.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2696 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3637 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
Ubuntu

Installing and configuring FireHOL - Part I

Post date: September 20, 2006, 22:09 Category: Network Views: 7105 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial guides user on how to install and configure FireHOL, a Linux-based firewall.
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