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Search results for Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems

Linux

Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3024 Comments
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Linux

Optimizing Linux filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3515 Comments
Tutorial quote: Last time we introduced a few common Linux filesystems and examined their features. If you've already installed Linux, your partitions are already set up and configured with particular filesystems, but you may decide you want to modify this configuration. What's the best way to begin?
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2958 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Debian

Installing and Configuring Exim4

Post date: February 25, 2006, 12:02 Category: Network Views: 3212 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installion of Exim4 from the latest Debian GNU/Linux packages is easy. The installation is now based around debconf. If you are upgrading from a simple Exim3 configuration, you can use exim_convert4r4 to convert your configuration file to the new format. If you used the previous version of this guide, which covered Exim3, the conversion should succeed without incident. I intend to discuss configuration via debconf, including setting up local delivery to Maildir format, handling local domain email, and configuring smarthosting for outbound email.
Linux

Converting All Your MS Outlook PST Files To Maildir Format

Post date: June 14, 2007, 01:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2919 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the challenges you may face when converting an office from Microsoft Windows to Linux is that many people archive their emails in PST files. There are PST tools available, but most of them are commercial, since the PST file format is closed and protected by Microsoft. There are several non-commercial methods to achieve roughly the same goal, and in this tutorial we use IMAP (more specifically, courier-imap) to convert all our emails from PST to the Maildir format. The advantage of this approach is that you also lay the foundation for a new mail system, with all your old emails already imported the day you switch over.
Ubuntu

How to Increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux

Post date: May 14, 2007, 00:05 Category: System Views: 4670 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux.The ext3 or third extended filesystem is a journalled file system that is commonly used by the Linux operating system. It is the default file system for many popular Linux distributions
Debian

Filesystems (ext3, reiser, xfs, jfs) comparison on Debian Etch

Post date: April 23, 2006, 08:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5798 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are a lot of Linux filesystems comparisons available but most of them are anecdotal, based on artificial tasks or completed under older kernels. This benchmark essay is based on 11 real-world tasks appropriate for a file server with older generation hardware (Pentium II/III, EIDE hard-drive).
Linux

Filesystem Encryption Tools for Linux

Post date: May 28, 2007, 00:05 Category: System Views: 3427 Comments
Tutorial quote: Crypto filesystems keep your data safe – even if someone steals your computer.Linux offers a number of encrypted filesystem options – each with a different approach to the encryption problem.Encrypted filesystems may be overkill
for family photos or your résumé, but they make sense for network-accessible servers that hold sensitive business
documents, databases that contain credit-card information, offline backups, and laptops.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4715 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Unix+clones

Benchmarking BSD and Linux

Post date: June 18, 2005, 22:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3665 Comments
Tutorial quote: These benchmarks are the result of my scalable network programming research. My interest in this area is to see how scalable and fast network applications can be on standard PC hardware.

I have done most of my research on Linux 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 kernels using a home-grown distribution I affectionately call "Leanux". I have experimented with several APIs and methods to try and get the most scalability and performance out of a web server. The ultimate goal, however, is to demonstrate scalability by surviving a Slashdotting.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink