Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Bluetooth Security Review, Part 1

FreeBSD

Bluetooth Security Review, Part 1

Post date: April 30, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 3100 Comments
Tutorial quote: Bluetooth (BT) wireless technology provides an easy way for a wide range of devices to communicate with each other and connect to the Internet without the need for wires, cables and connectors. The technology seams to be very interesting and beneficial, yet it can also be a high threat for the privacy and security of Bluetooth users.
Linux

Linux GPRS/EDGE via Bluetooth

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: Network Views: 3268 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this guide I will show you howto configure internet access through GPRS/EDGE, using bluetooth connection with your GSM phone.
Fedora

Manage Your Mobile Phone With Wammu Via Bluetooth On Fedora 8

Post date: November 27, 2007, 10:11 Category: Hardware Views: 6444 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to manage your mobile phone with Wammu via bluetooth on Fedora 8. Depending on the manufacturer and model of your mobile phone, you will be able to retrieve your contacts (SIM & phone), calls, messages, todos, calendar and system information. You can also create contacts, events, todos and messages or manage data backups. In addition you can use the bluetooth manager to access your mobile phone like a standard storage media or use the Gnome phone manager for realtime messaging.
OpenBSD

Apache - Serving up the Web

Post date: April 11, 2006, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 7323 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3686 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
Linux

Linux Security HOWTO

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 2854 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document is a general overview of security issues that face the administrator of Linux systems. It covers general security philosophy and a number of specific examples of how to better secure your Linux system from intruders. Also included are pointers to security-related material and programs.
Linux

Hardening Linux: a 10 step approach to a secure server

Post date: June 22, 2005, 10:06 Category: Security Views: 3529 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Internet has become a far more dangerous place than it was 20 years ago. Nowadays, Operating System and application security is an integral part of a server configuration and, while firewalls are very important, they are not the panacea.

This list of steps is intended as a guideline with a practical approach. We’ll try to provide a complete picture without getting into unnecesary details. This list won’t replace a good book on secure systems administration, but it will be useful as a quick guide.

Before we get started it’s worth to mention that security is not a status: it’s just a process. The correct initial setup of the server only provides a good start and helps you get half the way through. But you actually need to walk the other half of the road, by providing proper security vigilance, monitoring and updating.
FreeBSD

Working with gmirror on a Sun Fire X2100 (part 2)

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: System Views: 3462 Comments
Tutorial quote: Editorial note: This is the followup to Greg's previous piece, and continues where part one left off. It is recommended that you read and understand the content presented in part one before attempting any of the procedures documented here. Now without further ado...
Debian

Securing Debian Manual

Post date: January 1, 2008, 13:01 Category: Security Views: 3681 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes security in the Debian project and in the Debian operating system. Starting with the process of securing and hardening the default Debian GNU/Linux distribution installation, it also covers some of the common tasks to set up a secure network environment using Debian GNU/Linux, gives additional information on the security tools available and talks about how security is enforced in Debian by the security and audit team.
Debian

Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Security Views: 4734 Comments
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink