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FreeBSD

Building a FreeBSD Build System

Post date: April 15, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 3622 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
Linux

Automating Builds on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2577 Comments
Tutorial quote: An automated nightly build is a process for building an application every night using an infrastructure that automatically executes the required steps at the scheduled time, without any human intervention. A well-planned build process not only builds your application, but also provides you and your team with early detection of incompatible changes in the application components and early detection of errors introduced by newly integrated code. When configured and used properly, automated builds are a critical component for ensuring that the application satisfies quality requirements and continues to run as expected.
FreeBSD

Creating A DNS Cache With djbdns

Post date: May 5, 2007, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3749 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building a local DNS cache will speed up your internet connection since the time for the translation job (converting domain names into IP addresses) will become negligible with the assumption that the DNS cache gets the information from the parent DNS.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 2617 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your network is growing in size and complexity. It's taking on a life of its own, spreading and growing and absorbing everything in its path. You're tearing your hair out trying to keep track, and your users have somehow discovered your secret phone number and are pestering you with endless questions and demands--where do I find this; I don't want to keep track of a dozen different passwords; nothing works like it should.

Of several possible solutions, consider two: 1) find a new hiding place, or 2) implement an LDAP server. While finding a new hiding place might sound ideal, it's an option we're going to have to save for a future article. This series will instead explain what LDAP is good for, detail how to build an LDAP server, and cover what you can do with it.
Linux

Tuneups and Tweaks for the Better Spam-Trap

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 2592 Comments
Tutorial quote: In parts 1 and 2 of our thrilling "Building an Anti-Virus/Anti-Spam Gateway" series, we covered the basic steps for setting up SpamAssassin and Clam Anti-virus with Postfix. This installment is devoted to testing and tweaking, and creating whitelists in Amavisd-new. Whitelists are essential when you set up any kind of spam filtering: It's the best way to make sure your wanted mail gets through.
SuSe

Adobe Flash Player 10 installation on OpenSuSe

Post date: November 16, 2008, 06:11 Category: Installing Views: 5412 Comments
Tutorial quote: With Flash Player 10, Adobe is focusing on building "expressive" applications for the Web, said Tom Barclay, Adobe senior product marketing manager for Flash Player. Applications can be deployed including online video, rich Internet applications, online games, and other interactive experiences.
Linux

SpamAssassin and Amavisd

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 2675 Comments
Tutorial quote: The bad news is, it's SpamAssassin, not SpammerAssassin. The good news is it kills spam quite effectively, and fits nicely into an anti-spam, anti-virus gateway. This article, which shows how to use SpamAssassin with Postfix, is the first in a series on building an anti-spam and anti-virus gateway. This gateway works equally well for a single PC, or for a large network.
Unix+clones

Using network transfer protocols

Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 2174 Comments
Tutorial quote: Let's face it, most of us are in a rut when it comes to moving our files around. We learned how to use a simple FTP client years ago, and maybe even updated to a GUI FTP client when we were feeling particularly adventurous. There are actually a wealth of tools available for transferring files, and some of them perform automation functions that can easily assist your business in building site mirrors, synchronizing directory contents, and more.

Keep in mind that for many of the tools covered here, there's only really room to skim through their features. Some, such as wget and rsync, are full of useful capabilities for those brave enough to read their man pages and experiment.
Linux

Building a Linux video jukebox for an anime convention

Post date: November 25, 2005, 21:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3057 Comments
Tutorial quote: I wrote this little whitepaper a while back for Amy Zunk to document the function of the VideoKeg/VideoJukebox boxes. Documented here for posterity. The primary goal of the video keg was to build a reliable video box that was easy to transport with enough space to store 3 days worth of Anime fan-subs.

The secondary goal of the video keg was to make a home PVR system for video playback and time-shifting, along with a video arcade and perhaps a web browser. The tertiary goal of the video keg was to find an affordable hardware platform so that we could buy 4 of them immmediately to service the primary goal's need for 4 separate video rooms.

For a PVR, the machine neeed to be small, quiet, low-heat, and still fast enough to run the software video player and arcade games. For portability, we decided to go with a smaller mini-ITX style cube box.
CentOS

How To Install Qmailtoaster (CentOS 5.3)

Post date: June 19, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 7212 Comments
Tutorial quote: Qmailtoaster is a project that aims to make the installation of Qmail onto RPM based systems a snap. All of the packages are distributed in source RPMs so building the packages for your particular distro and architecture is as easy as running a script or a simple command for each package. The RPMs have all of the needed and commonly asked for patches included so you can have a mail server up and running in about an hour. When it's all complete, you'll have a full Qmail mail server installation ready for just about anything. I personally run Qmailtoaster servers for other companies and ISPs who have tens of thousands of users on their systems.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink