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Search results for Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ

Proxmox+VE

KVM & OpenVZ Virtualization And Cloud Computing With Proxmox VE

Post date: February 17, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 19070 Comments
Tutorial quote: Proxmox VE (virtual environment) is a distribution based on Debian Etch (x86_64); it provides an OpenSource virtualization platform for running virtual machines (OpenVZ and KVM) and comes with a powerful, web-based control panel (it includes a web-based graphical console that you can use to connect to the virtual machines). With Proxmox VE, you can even create a cluster of virtualization hosts and create/control virtual machines on remote hosts from the control panel. Proxmox VE also supports live migration of virtual machines from one host to the other. This guide shows how you can use Proxmox VE to control KVM and OpenVZ virtual machines and how to create a small computing cloud with it.
CentOS

Managing OpenVZ With HyperVM On CentOS 5.2

Post date: February 5, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 4947 Comments
Tutorial quote: HyperVM is a multi-platform, multi-tiered, multi-server, multi-virtualization web based application that will allow you to create and manage different virtual machines each based on different technologies across machines and platforms. Currently it supports OpenVZ and Xen virtualization and is available for RHEL 4/5 as well as CentOS 4 and CentOS 5. This tutorial shows how to install it on a CentOS 5.2 server to control OpenVZ containers. I will also explain how to manage OpenVZ containers with HyperVM on a remote CentOS 5.2 server ("slave").
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 2697 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Linux

Building a Virtual Cluster with Xen

Post date: September 28, 2006, 04:09 Category: Emulation Views: 7510 Comments
Tutorial quote: It is a common practice to have development and test servers for each production server, so that you can experiment with changes without the fear of breaking anything important, but this is usually not feasible with clusters. So how do you try that new version of your favorite program before committing it to the production cluster? A cheap and convenient possibility is to build a virtual cluster.

Thanks to the Xen virtual machine monitor, you can create a number of virtual machines, all running simultaneously in your computer, install different operating systems in them, or just different configurations, and connect them via (virtual) network cards. Xen is a terrific tool for building virtual Beowulf clusters. It can prove useful when learning or teaching about clusters or for testing new features/software without the fear of causing major damage to an existing cluster.
Linux

Building a Linux virtual server

Post date: June 9, 2005, 14:06 Category: Software Views: 2993 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the explosive growth of the Internet, the workload on servers providing Web, email, and media services has increased greatly. More and more sites are being challenged to keep up with the growing demands and are employing several techniques to avoid overloading their servers. Building a scalable server on a cluster of computers is one of the solutions that is being effectively put to use. With such a cluster, the increasing requests can be easily managed by simply adding one or more new servers to the existing cluster as required. In this article we will look at setting up one such scalable, network load-balancing server cluster using a virtual server via the Linux Virtual Server Project.
Debian

Xen from Backports on Debian Sarge

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Software Views: 2747 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is a great howto about installing Xen on Debian Unstable. It is really easy to do and it runs fine. Nevertheless, on production servers, that's not an optimal solution. Debian Unstable has too many updates and things change too often. On production machines, a Xen host system should be stable, secure and should not need much attention. That is where Sarge comes in. If you pull the Xen packages from backports and install them on Debian stable you've got the best of both worlds. Let's do so!
Debian

Intrusion Detection With BASE And Snort

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Security Views: 4518 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure BASE (Basic Analysis and Security Engine) and the Snort intrusion detection system (IDS) on a Debian Sarge system. BASE provides a web front-end to query and analyze the alerts coming from a Snort IDS system. With BASE you can perform analysis of intrusions that Snort has detected on your network.

Scenario: A linux server running Debian Sarge 3.1 setup according to Falko's - The Perfect Setup - Debian Sarge (3.1).
Let's assume we have one working website (www.example.com) and that the document root is: /var/www/www.example.com/web
The IP of the server is 192.168.0.5 and it's using eth0 as network interface name.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge

Post date: October 22, 2006, 19:10 Category: Emulation Views: 5961 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system. It shows how to compile Xen, dom0 and domU kernels from the sources as well as how to install Xen from precompiled binaries. Creating guest domains from images is also covered by this article.
Debian

Debian Sarge (3.1) with Ruby on Rails and Apache 2 with FastCGI

Post date: May 19, 2006, 18:05 Category: Network Views: 2928 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto will step you through installing Debian (Sarge) with Ruby on Rails and Apache 2 with FastCGI managed with ISPConfig.
Debian

How To Compile A Kernel - The Debian (Sarge) Way

Post date: December 21, 2006, 22:12 Category: System Views: 3268 Comments
Tutorial quote: Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on Debian Sarge systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.
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