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Debian

Boot On BTRFS With Debian

Post date: August 2, 2009, 11:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2920 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will explain you how to boot from a BTRFS filesystem with kernel 2.6.31-RC4 and BTRFS 0.19. BTRFS is a new filesystem with some really interesting features like online defragmenting and snapshots. BTRFS is an experimental filesystem, use at your own risk. The kernel used is also experimental.
Fedora

How To Install VMware Server 2 On A Fedora 14 Desktop (Kernel 2.6.35)

Post date: December 23, 2010, 13:12 Category: Installing Views: 2459 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server 2 on a Fedora 14 desktop system (with kernel 2.6.35). With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
Fedora

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Post date: March 8, 2009, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 3951 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V). Hardware virtualization allows you to install unmodified guest systems (in contrast to paravirtualization where the guest kernel needs to be modified); that way you cannot only virtualize OpenSource operating systems like Linux and BSD, but also closed-source operating systems like Windows where you cannot modify the kernel.
Fedora

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Post date: October 1, 2007, 10:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2975 Comments
Tutorial quote: Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery. It requires kernel 2.6.21 or newer with tickless idle enabled (CONFIG_NO_HZ) (which is currently available for 32-bit kernels only). Fedora 7 comes with a 2.6.21 kernel by default, so we can use Powertop on it.
FreeBSD

Building a FreeBSD Build System

Post date: April 15, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 3624 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
Linux

Enabling S.M.A.R.T for SATA disks

Post date: October 10, 2005, 12:10 Category: System Views: 2786 Comments
Tutorial quote: This very short tutorial shows you how to enable S.M.A.R.T reporting for SATA disks on 2.6 linux kernel.
Linux

Automating Builds on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2581 Comments
Tutorial quote: An automated nightly build is a process for building an application every night using an infrastructure that automatically executes the required steps at the scheduled time, without any human intervention. A well-planned build process not only builds your application, but also provides you and your team with early detection of incompatible changes in the application components and early detection of errors introduced by newly integrated code. When configured and used properly, automated builds are a critical component for ensuring that the application satisfies quality requirements and continues to run as expected.
FreeBSD

Creating A DNS Cache With djbdns

Post date: May 5, 2007, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3752 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building a local DNS cache will speed up your internet connection since the time for the translation job (converting domain names into IP addresses) will become negligible with the assumption that the DNS cache gets the information from the parent DNS.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 2620 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your network is growing in size and complexity. It's taking on a life of its own, spreading and growing and absorbing everything in its path. You're tearing your hair out trying to keep track, and your users have somehow discovered your secret phone number and are pestering you with endless questions and demands--where do I find this; I don't want to keep track of a dozen different passwords; nothing works like it should.

Of several possible solutions, consider two: 1) find a new hiding place, or 2) implement an LDAP server. While finding a new hiding place might sound ideal, it's an option we're going to have to save for a future article. This series will instead explain what LDAP is good for, detail how to build an LDAP server, and cover what you can do with it.
Unix+clones

Comparing MySQL performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3425 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
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