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Search results for Change your Network card MAC ( Media Access Control) address Using macchanger

OpenSUSE

Setup and Configuration of Opensource Media Center - Elisa

Post date: September 28, 2008, 09:09 Category: Multimedia Views: 4645 Comments
Tutorial quote: Elisa is an open source cross-platform media center connecting the Internet to an all-in-one media player.
Linux

Make Your Linux Desktop Look Like A Mac - Mac4Lin Project Documentation

Post date: October 30, 2007, 11:10 Category: Desktop Views: 7842 Comments
Tutorial quote: Do you want to give your desktop a dash of Mac OS X? The goal of this project is to bring the look and feel of Mac OS X (latest being 10.5, Leopard) to *nix GTK based systems. This document will present the procedure to install Mac4Lin pack & tweak certain things to get that almost perfect Mac OS X like desktop.
FreeBSD

Using FreeBSD's ACLs

Post date: September 29, 2005, 17:09 Category: Security Views: 4451 Comments
Tutorial quote: Five years ago (gee, has it really been that long?), I wrote a series of articles on understanding Unix permissions. Since then, FreeBSD has implemented something known as ACLs (Access Control Lists).

ACLs came to BSD as part of the TrustedBSD project. As the name suggests, they give a user finer access control over permissions.
Ubuntu

Howto install VLC media player 1.0.0 in Ubuntu

Post date: July 31, 2009, 13:07 Category: Software Views: 3858 Comments
Tutorial quote: VLC media player is a highly portable multimedia player for various audio and video formats (MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, DivX, mp3, ogg, ) as well as DVDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols.It can also be used as a server to stream in unicast or multicast in IPv4 or IPv6 on a high-bandwidth network.
SGI

Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network

Post date: May 21, 2005, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 7152 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
Linux

How to install MusicPD, Pitchfork and IceCast

Post date: June 22, 2007, 03:06 Category: Multimedia Views: 7092 Comments
Tutorial quote: Music Player Daemon (MPD) allows remote access for playing music (MP3, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, AAC, Mod, and wave files) and managing playlists. MPD is designed for integrating a computer into a stereo system that provides control for music playback over a local network. Pitchfork on the other hand is a graphical user interface based on Ajax, allowing you to control MPD with your browser.
In this tutorial you'll see how to get them up and running.
Ubuntu

How to Configure an $80 File Server in 45 Minutes

Post date: November 24, 2006, 03:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4719 Comments
Tutorial quote: I use a modded Xbox and Xbox Media Center for playing media files across the network on my television and sound system. I also download large files, such as Linux ISOs, via BitTorrent. However, leaving my primary computer on all the time seemed like a waste of energy. I wanted a cheap, small headless machine that I could use as a Samba server and BitTorrent client so I could leave my workstation off when I wasn't using it.
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 15462 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
Ubuntu

Newbie-Friendly Post-Installation Ubuntu Usability Setup Guide

Post date: November 5, 2009, 12:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4472 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is designed for new Linux users that are familiar with Microsoft Windows. The goal is to address some of the most common issues that these people face. (Namely, media codecs, and general terminology.) I tried to write it as someone might explain it vocally; I attempted to add humor in an effort to keep it interesting, although I make no guarantees that it is actually funny.
Debian

Wireless networking using the ndiswrapper module

Post date: June 4, 2006, 17:06 Category: Network Views: 6516 Comments
Tutorial quote: Getting wireless networking working with the ndiswrapper driver is fairly straightfoward if your card has an associated Windows driver. Here we'll look at getting wireless networking working for a Dell Inspiron 1300, you should be able to follow the recipe for most other wireless networking cards which are supported ndiswrapper.

ndiswrapper is a collection of utilities which essentially allows you to load and run a network card driver written for Microsoft Windows upon your Linux kernel. This means that a card which isn't supported natively may be used indirectly.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink