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Search results for Change your Network card MAC ( Media Access Control) address Using macchanger

Ubuntu

Tweaking Hidden Ubuntu Settings With Ubuntu Tweak

Post date: January 29, 2008, 12:01 Category: Desktop Views: 4753 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu Tweak is a tool that lets you change hidden Ubuntu settings, for example: hide or change the splash screen, show or hide the Computer, Home, Trash, and Network icons, change Metacity, Nautilus, power management, and security settings, etc. Currently Ubuntu Tweak is available only for the Ubuntu GNOME desktop, i.e., it will not work on Kubuntu or Xubuntu. This short guide shows how to install and use Ubuntu Tweak.
Debian

Using multiple network cards in XEN

Post date: December 10, 2006, 09:12 Category: Emulation Views: 8778 Comments
Tutorial quote: Xen is great. But installing more than one network card became a pain when I tried it the first time. There are some documents describing the principle but I was unable to find a real life example somewhere else. So this is a summary about how it works here now.
Linux

Router Bandwidth Management Example

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: Network Views: 5734 Comments
Tutorial quote: I will show you how to use HTB to control traffic based on what IP address you are coming from. Remember that HTB only shapes outgoing traffic, but since we have at least 2 interfaces on a router - and traffic is always outgoing on one of the interfaces - we can control up and down speeds.
Linux

Change Ctrl + Alt + Delete Behavior To Open System Monitor, in Linux

Post date: September 24, 2009, 12:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2973 Comments
Tutorial quote: Actually, I've written this post before (quite a few months ago) but then deleted it because it didn't work. In the mean time, I found out why, so I decided to post it again. I find pressing Control + Alt + Delete to open up System Monitor to be very useful, especially for Windows users who are used to it and may actually press this quite a few times before realizing it doesn't do anything or what it does in Windows. Using System Monitor, you can preview all running processes, end or kill them, see how much CPU a process is using, CPU + memory + network history, available disk space and even change how much CPU a process should use.

There are 2 ways of changing Ctrl + Alt + Delete behavior to open System Monitor: one if you are running Compiz, and one for Metacity, only to use if you are not running Compiz.
Ubuntu

Enable WPA Wireless access point in Ubuntu

Post date: February 15, 2007, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 5314 Comments
Tutorial quote: I have a Thoshiba laptop at home, I was running “Edgy Eft” (Ubuntu Linux 6.10) But one of the important things about it was its inability to connect to WPA-encrypted Wifi access points.In my home i have a WPA Enabled Wireless router so i need to connect to my wireless network using WPA.I am giving the procedure that worked for me to enable wpa in my toshiba laptop.This will work most of ubuntu users who is trying to access WPA network.
FreeBSD

How I created my own .mac replacement

Post date: February 7, 2006, 21:02 Category: Network Views: 4391 Comments
Tutorial quote: My .mac subscription is 60 days from renewal so I have to ask myself, "how useful is .mac to me?

Is .mac worth it to me? Many of the reasons I don't find .mac useful are the same reasons I encourage others to use .mac. One has to keep in mind that I'm not an "average" computer user. My needs are different and Apple wouldn't make any money trying to sell a .mac like service to guys like me. This is not an "I hate .mac" site but rather an explanation of the motivation and methods I used to provide myself with comparable services that are more usable to me. I publish it so that others may benefit from what I have learned.

This is published to help others, but don't expect free support from the author. Support requests that arrive without monetary compensation for my time will almost certainly be ignored. Instead, try using the support forums and maybe someone will help you out.

To understand why I did this, you might want to read about my use of .mac services.

Project Goals:

Retain the useful features: Regardless of whether or not I renew my subscription, I want to retain the features I have found most useful (iDisk, iSync (between computers), iCal sharing, and Backup).

Enhance the useful features: Simply retaining the useful features would be an utter failure. The most value can be found in addressing the shortcomings of each feature. For iDisk, speed and disk space are the impediments to it's usefulness. iSync already works quite well. iCal sharing works well but publish and subscribe updates are sloooow. Backup is hamstrung by the iDisk space issue.
OSX

Enhancing Performance Of Mac OS X

Post date: December 29, 2005, 14:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 7483 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are certain things that would help Mac OS X perform well and be more responsive (you could say 'snappy'). Here are some ways to eliminate the typical bottlenecks.
OSX

A mini-guide to Mac OS X for new Mini owners

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4467 Comments
Tutorial quote: One thing the Mac mini does not have is a comprehensive “welcome to OS X” guide. Printed documentation included with the mini is scanty — primarily EULA and warranty information, and Apple has never been one for flashy tutorials. That’s why we at Ars have pulled together a short list of things every newcomer to Mac OS X needs to know.

This guide is not intended to be comprehensive and answer every conceivable question Windows and Linux users will have about their new platform. What it does intend to do is give you the lowdown on some basic things: window management, accessing your Windows box from the Mac, and application behavior.
Linux

Advantages of IPv6 - The Next Generation Internet

Post date: January 27, 2009, 07:01 Category: Network Views: 4075 Comments
Tutorial quote: The most important and most visible improvement brought by the new protocol is the enormous expansion of the available address space. An IPv6 address is made up of 128 bit values instead of the traditional 32 bits. This provides for as many as several quadrillion IP addresses.
Ubuntu

How To Configure Remote Access To Your Ubuntu Desktop

Post date: February 14, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 4823 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can enable a remote desktop on an Ubuntu desktop so that you can access and control it remotely. This makes sense for example if you have customers that are not very tech-savvy. If they have a problem, you can log in to their desktops without the need to drive to their location. I will also show how to access the remote Ubuntu desktop from a Windows XP client and an Ubuntu client.
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