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Search results for Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7479 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
RedHat

Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Security Views: 3803 Comments
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
RedHat

NIST Publically-Released Red Hat Enterprise Linux Benchmark

Post date: October 21, 2006, 04:10 Category: Benchmarks Views: 6630 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.
RedHat

Tuning and Optimizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Oracle 9i and 10g Databases

Post date: December 19, 2007, 06:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 9633 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is a step by step guide for tuning and optimizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on x86 and x86-64 platforms running Oracle 9i (32bit/64bit) and Oracle 10g (32bit/64bit) standalone and RAC databases. This guide covers Red Hat Enterprise Linux Advanced Server 3 and 4 and the older version 2.1.
Solaris

NIST Publically-Released Fedora/Red Hat Core Security Guide

Post date: October 21, 2006, 04:10 Category: Security Views: 6060 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.
White+Box

The perfect Setup - White Box Linux

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Installing Views: 6064 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a Linux server based on White Box Linux that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

Since White Box Linux is very similar to Red Hat Enterprise Linux this tutorial should also work for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
RedHat

Ruby on Rails on Red Hat

Post date: November 27, 2006, 07:11 Category: Network Views: 6486 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ruby on Rails is an open source freely available web development framework. It's been quite popular--it won a Jolt "Web Development Tools" award last year, and some prominent Java developers have publically switched to Ruby on Rails. The buzz surrounding Rails is quite impressive--particularly when you consider that Rails had no Fortune 500 company to market it, unlike .NET or Java.

Rails is a Model View Controller (MVC) framework. As you can imagine from the name, applications written using Model View Controller frameworks have three main components: a model, which represents the data and associated logic; the view, which represents how a user interacts with the application; and the controller, which contains all of the business logic that drives the application. This is an artificial distinction, of course, but it is a powerful one.

You'll need Apache 2.0+ and MySQL installed on your Red Hat Linux computer to run these examples.
Fedora

Upgrade Fedora 9 with Fedora 10

Post date: December 5, 2008, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 2790 Comments
Tutorial quote: Fedora 10 codenamed "Cambridge" has been released. This new version of the community oriented, Red Hat backed Linux distribution comes with new features which enhance the end user experience.
RedHat

Tips & tricks: Performance tuning

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 8668 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6082 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
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