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Debian

Removing Unwanted Startup Debian Files or Services

Post date: January 5, 2007, 07:01 Category: System Views: 3453 Comments
Tutorial quote: Under Debian Linux ( and most other distros) startup files are stored in /etc/init.d/ directory and symbolic linked between /etc/rcX.d/ directory exists. Debian Linux (Red Hat/ Fedora) uses System V initialization scripts to start services at boot time from /etc/rcX.d/ directory. Debian Linux comes with different utilities to remove unwanted startup files.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 1

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4414 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.
Unix+clones

Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Post date: November 26, 2005, 01:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 3577 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Debian

An apt-get primer

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2683 Comments
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3636 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
Linux

Adding Windows Fonts in Linux

Post date: December 3, 2005, 07:12 Category: Desktop Views: 2532 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike past times, Linux do come with good fonts. And the font rendering can be made better by choosing to antialiase the fonts. But at times you come across a website which has been designed with the windows user in mind. Such websites are best viewed with one of the windows fonts. If you have windows OS installed on your machine, you can copy the essential fonts from the windows partition to linux and use them to get a better web experience. Here is how you do it.
SuSe

Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: System Views: 3438 Comments
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
Linux

Mastering the Enterprise Volume Management System

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 2656 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Enterprise Volume Management System, or EVMS, is a disk, partition, and file system manager for Linux that claims to be a comprehensive tool for all disk management tasks. I ran across EVMS and found the idea appealing, so I decided to try it out. I've been working with it for a couple of weeks now, and this article describes what I found.
SuSe

How to set up smart package manager on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 30, 2005, 00:10 Category: System Views: 3580 Comments
Tutorial quote: Quote from the tutorial: The advantage of smartpm is, that, besides the ability to use mirrors it is able to use different repository structures. So I was able to use the apt-repository structure which provides more channels then the actual yum structure [...], and so I was able to build up a package management with update channels which is capable of using and choosing mirrors in a similar way as yum is.
OpenSUSE

Virtual Box - How to Install & Configure in openSUSE

Post date: August 9, 2008, 17:08 Category: Emulation Views: 5896 Comments
Tutorial quote: VirtualBox is a family of powerful x86 virtualization products for enterprise as well as home use. Not only is VirtualBox an extremely feature rich, high performance product for enterprise customers, it is also the only professional solution that is freely available as Open Source Software under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL).
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