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Linux

Chrooting Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 2700 Comments
Tutorial quote: The chroot daemon allows you to run a program and have it see a given directory as the root (/) directory. This effectively locks the process into its very own filesystem ("chroot jail") isolated from the real / filesystem. In this article we will look at how to install the Apache Web server in such an environment.
Fedora

Chrooting Apache2 With mod_chroot On Fedora 12

Post date: April 6, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 2428 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up mod_chroot with Apache2 on a Fedora 12 system. With mod_chroot, you can run Apache2 in a secure chroot environment and make your server less vulnerable to break-in attempts that try to exploit vulnerabilities in Apache2 or your installed web applications.
Debian

Chrooting Apache2 With mod_chroot On Debian Lenny

Post date: April 15, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 2541 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up mod_chroot with Apache2 on a Debian Lenny system. With mod_chroot, you can run Apache2 in a secure chroot environment and make your server less vulnerable to break-in attempts that try to exploit vulnerabilities in Apache2 or your installed web applications.
Debian

Chrooted SFTP With MySecureShell On Debian Etch

Post date: September 19, 2007, 22:09 Category: Security Views: 4154 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install MySecureShell on a Debian Etch system. MySecureShell is an SFTP server that is based on OpenSSH and can be configured in many ways, e.g. it has support for chrooting users into their homedirs or for limiting upload-/download bandwidths. MySecureShell makes SFTP available for users that do not have shell access so that these users do not have to use the insecure FTP protocol anymore.
Unix+clones

Installing and securing Squid

Post date: March 13, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 4755 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Unix+clones

Apache Maintenance Basics

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Software Views: 2798 Comments
Tutorial quote: You've downloaded and configured your Apache server and are ready to move on to the next project. Can it really be left to fend for itself in a darkened room?

Yes. To some degree, anyway. With the exception of configuration testing, once Apache is up, you likely need never think about how the Web server is running.

On the other hand, completely ignoring your Apache installation would be foolhardy. Doing some regular checks and maintenance on your Apache installation helps identify any issues — usually before they even become issues — and helps you stay up date with the latest security and performance patches. This article covers some of the major steps and maintenance tasks that should be regularly undertaken while the Apache system is running.
Solaris

Configuring Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 4074 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
OpenBSD

Apache - Serving up the Web

Post date: April 11, 2006, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 7253 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Linux

Splitting Apache Logs With vlogger

Post date: June 17, 2007, 22:06 Category: Software Views: 3322 Comments
Tutorial quote: Vlogger is a little tool with which you can write Apache logs broken down by virtual hosts and days. With vlogger, we need to put just one CustomLog directive into our global Apache configuration, and it will write access logs for each virtual host and day. Therefore, you do not have to split Apache's overall access log into access logs for each virtual host each day, and you do not have to configure Apache to write one access log per virtual host (which could make you run out of file descriptors very fast).
Linux

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: April 1, 2006, 03:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 4286 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
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