Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux system

Debian

Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux system

Post date: November 25, 2006, 08:11 Category: System Views: 3422 Comments
Tutorial quote: You arrive at a Debian GNU/Linux server which has some history of neglection. Let's suppose someone else neglected it but if your new-year resolution is to stop neglecting your beloved server, this applies as well.

One form of neglection is to install, install, install and never un-install any package. The common utility to perform installation and un-installation of packages is apt-get which adds to the problem because it doesn't have automatic removal of non-needed dependences.

That means that when phpMyAdmin was installed it also installed Apache, PHP and ton of other packages. phpMyAdmin was removed when it was no longer needed but Apache, PHP and the ton of packages remain there.

Aptitude to the rescue.
Debian

Securing Debian Manual

Post date: January 1, 2008, 13:01 Category: Security Views: 3680 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes security in the Debian project and in the Debian operating system. Starting with the process of securing and hardening the default Debian GNU/Linux distribution installation, it also covers some of the common tasks to set up a secure network environment using Debian GNU/Linux, gives additional information on the security tools available and talks about how security is enforced in Debian by the security and audit team.
Debian

Installing new Debian systems with debootstrap

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Installing Views: 3178 Comments
Tutorial quote: When it comes to installing new installations of Debian GNU/Linux there is one tool which should not be ignored. Whether you're dealing with a real system, or a virtualised one, the debootstrap tool is ideal for quickly installing new Debian environments.

Put simply the debootstrap package allows you to install a fresh copy of Debian GNU/Linux into a directory. This new installation will have all the basic packages and binaries which you'd expect to be present
Linux

Gnu Queue: Linux Clustering Made Easy

Post date: December 22, 2005, 19:12 Category: System Views: 2960 Comments
Tutorial quote: GNU Queue makes it easy to cluster Linux workstations. If you already know how to control jobs running on your local machine, you already know how to control remote jobs using GNU Queue. You don't even need special privileges to install and run GNU Queue on your cluster--anyone can do it. Once you've discovered how incredibly easy it is to cluster Linux environments with GNU Queue, you'll wonder why organizations continue to spend so much money on comparatively hard-to-cluster Windows NT environments.
Debian

Little-known APT utilities for Debian desktop users

Post date: July 30, 2006, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2660 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) is a distinguishing feature of Debian-based systems. APT was the first major alternative in GNU/Linux to boast automatic dependency resolution. Most GNU/Linux users know it through the apt-get command, a utility that calls on the lower-level dpkg command. However, other APT-based utilities remain largely unknown to desktop users. Some of these utilities offer a range of functionality far beyond those of the basic tools.
Debian

Debian RAID 1/5 system installer

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3126 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Debian

Installing Debian onto USB flash media with everything encrypted

Post date: September 28, 2005, 16:09 Category: Security Views: 6901 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a simple procedure for installing Debian GNU/Linux onto a USB key flash media. It includes several configuration changes but tries to stay as close to a default debian install as possible.

This is useful for administrators that need to carry sensitive information or people concerned about their privacy.
Debian

Setting up Subversion and websvn on Debian

Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: Network Views: 6146 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto will illustrate a way to install and configure Subversion and websvn on a Debian server with the following features:
- multiple repository Subversion
- access to the repositories via WebDAV (https, https) and ssh
- Linux system account access control and/or Apache level access control
- a secured websvn (php web application for easy code browsing)
- configured syntax coloring in websvn with gnu enscript
Debian

Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable

Post date: February 3, 2006, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 3646 Comments
Tutorial quote: For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq. For those who you wish to learn how to use ISC's BIND and DHCP, for example as a learning exercise, this is how I got it all to work in Debian Sarge, the current stable version of Debian GNU/Linux.

This short article was prompted by my question on the Debian-Administration forum site, where I was able to get some answers to the issues I faced and I did promise to post a solution if I got one.
Debian

Avoiding slow package updates with package diffs

Post date: September 18, 2006, 13:09 Category: Network Views: 2955 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're using the unstable or testing distribution of Debian GNU/Linux you will almost certainly have noticed that apt-get uses daily-diffs for its package updates. In many common situtations this is more bandwidth efficient, however it isn't always appropriate.

apt-get is a standard command which is used by many Debian users to manage package installation, and upgrades. (Although there are also other package managers such as synaptic, or aptitude.)
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink