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Solaris

How to Perform System Boot and Shutdown Procedures for Solaris 10

Post date: February 6, 2006, 07:02 Category: System Views: 10917 Comments
Tutorial quote: System startup requires an understanding of the hardware and the operating system functions that are required to bring the system to a running state. This chapter discusses the operations that the system must perform from the time you power on the system until you receive a system logon prompt. In addition, it covers the steps required to properly shut down a system. After reading this chapter, you’ll understand how to boot the system from the OpenBoot programmable read-only memory (PROM) and what operations must take place to start up the kernel and Unix system processes.
Ubuntu

How to Upgrade to Alsa 1.0.20 on Ubuntu Jaunty 9.04

Post date: August 14, 2009, 18:08 Category: Installing Views: 1695 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (known by the acronym ALSA) is a Linux kernel component intended to replace the original Open Sound System (OSS) for providing device drivers for sound cards. If you are experiencing sound issues on Ubuntu Jaunty 9.04 or just want the latest version, you may want to upgrade to ALSA 1.0.20 (Ubuntu Jaunty comes with Alsa version 1.0.18rc3 - you can check this by typing this in a terminal: cat /proc/asound/version). Read on!
Debian

Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Lenny Server

Post date: March 17, 2009, 11:03 Category: Installing Views: 4467 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Lenny server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Mandriva

Virtualization With KVM On A Mandriva 2010.0 Server

Post date: March 25, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 4064 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Mandriva 2010.0 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Debian

Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Squeeze Server

Post date: March 13, 2011, 18:03 Category: Installing Views: 3176 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Squeeze server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Debian

Wireless networking using the ndiswrapper module

Post date: June 4, 2006, 17:06 Category: Network Views: 5448 Comments
Tutorial quote: Getting wireless networking working with the ndiswrapper driver is fairly straightfoward if your card has an associated Windows driver. Here we'll look at getting wireless networking working for a Dell Inspiron 1300, you should be able to follow the recipe for most other wireless networking cards which are supported ndiswrapper.

ndiswrapper is a collection of utilities which essentially allows you to load and run a network card driver written for Microsoft Windows upon your Linux kernel. This means that a card which isn't supported natively may be used indirectly.
Debian

dmcrypt

Post date: January 25, 2006, 22:01 Category: Security Views: 4352 Comments
Tutorial quote: Device-mapper is a new infrastructure in the Linux 2.6 kernel that provides a generic way to create virtual layers of block devices that can do different things on top of real block devices like striping, concatenation, mirroring, snapshotting, etc... The device-mapper is used by the LVM2 and EVMS 2.x tools. dm-crypt is such a device-mapper target that provides transparent encryption of block devices using the new Linux 2.6 cryptoapi. Writes to this device will be encrypted and reads decrypted. You can mount your filesystem on it as usual. But without the key you can't access your data. It does basically the same as cryptoloop only that it's a much cleaner code and better suits the need of a block device and has a more flexible configuration interface. The on-disk format is also compatible.
Ubuntu

How to get ath5k working on Jaunty with Compat-wireless and a self-compiled kernel

Post date: May 27, 2009, 07:05 Category: Software Views: 3275 Comments
Tutorial quote: I used to have some trouble while setting up my Atheros PCI card on Ubuntu Linux 9.04. It worked natively on Ubuntu 8.04, where it was detected as ath0. I upgraded from 8.04 to 8.10 whereby I noticed my wireless PCI card didn’t work natively anymore. Someone suggested me to upgrade from 8.10 to 9.04 Jaunty, and I did that immediately. After the system upgrade I noticed again that my wireless device was gone in Ubuntu 9.04. When I ran iwconfig I didn’t see wlan0 or ath0 anymore.

Gentoo

Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To

Post date: April 13, 2005, 20:04 Category: System Views: 3718 Comments
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
Ubuntu

How To Install VMware Server 2 On Ubuntu 10.10 (Kernel 2.6.35)

Post date: December 21, 2010, 13:12 Category: Installing Views: 2895 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server 2 on an Ubuntu 10.10 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
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