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Linux

Embedding Python In Apache2 With mod_python (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva, OpenSUSE)

Post date: July 22, 2008, 09:07 Category: Installing Views: 4068 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and use mod_python on various distributions (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva, OpenSUSE) with Apache2. mod_python is an Apache module that embeds the Python interpreter within the server. It allows you to write web-based applications in Python that will run many times faster than traditional CGI and will have access to advanced features such as ability to retain database connections and other data between hits and access to Apache internals.
Yellow+Dog

Installing Linux on the Mac mini

Post date: May 11, 2005, 12:05 Category: Installing Views: 7151 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 4371 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
Debian

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions On Debian Lenny

Post date: May 26, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 7915 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server on Debian Lenny. A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers don't have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions (i386 and x86_64): Debian Lenny, Ubuntu 9.04, Fedora 10, CentOS 5.3, OpenSuSE 11.1, and Mandriva 2009.1.
Debian

How to filter spam with Spamassassin and Postfix in Debian

Post date: April 20, 2008, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 4113 Comments
Tutorial quote: We have already discussed how to install mail server with postfix+Devcot+SASL +Squirrel Mail in this article we will see how to add spam filter for postfix mail server.Apache SpamAssassin is an extensible email filter that is used to identify spam. Once identified, the mail can then be optionally tagged as spam for later filtering. It provides a command line tool to perform filtering, a client-server system to filter large volumes of mail, and Mail::SpamAssassin, a set of Perl modules allowing Apache
SpamAssassin to be used in a wide variety of email systems.

Ubuntu

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions With Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Post date: December 20, 2006, 01:12 Category: Installing Views: 4724 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft). A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers don't have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions: Ubuntu Edgy/Dapper, Debian Etch/Sarge, Fedora Core 6, CentOS 4.4, OpenSuSE 10.2, and Mandriva 2007.
Ubuntu

Insights for a quick and easy Ubuntu printer installation

Post date: June 4, 2006, 18:06 Category: Hardware Views: 7927 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu makes printing reasonably easy and straightforward. This brief article is for those who need a specific and encouraging step-by-step guide. I hope that this article will not only ensure that you print with ease, but that you have every reason to enjoy a productive GNU/Linux desktop.

Before you begin the installation steps below, connect your printer/s. You need to do this prior to turning your system on. This helps to ensure Ubuntu recognizes how the printer is connected to the system, and it allows Ubuntu to identify the specific printer port.

Please don’t be dismayed if you plug in your printer and it’s not immediately recognized. I assure you that Ubuntu recognizes the printer. However, you will first need to configure the printer as an available device so other programs can use it.

The Ubuntu Printing Configuration Tool is used to accomplish this. For my example I will use an HP Deskjet printer connected to the Ubuntu system via a USB cable. However, these steps will also apply to printers that connect via a direct or Parallel cable.
Debian

Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux system

Post date: November 25, 2006, 08:11 Category: System Views: 4069 Comments
Tutorial quote: You arrive at a Debian GNU/Linux server which has some history of neglection. Let's suppose someone else neglected it but if your new-year resolution is to stop neglecting your beloved server, this applies as well.

One form of neglection is to install, install, install and never un-install any package. The common utility to perform installation and un-installation of packages is apt-get which adds to the problem because it doesn't have automatic removal of non-needed dependences.

That means that when phpMyAdmin was installed it also installed Apache, PHP and ton of other packages. phpMyAdmin was removed when it was no longer needed but Apache, PHP and the ton of packages remain there.

Aptitude to the rescue.
Linux

Removing A User

Post date: April 8, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 4689 Comments
Tutorial quote: Employee turnover in most organizations runs high. So unless you run a small shop with a stable user base, you need to learn how to clean up after an employee leaves. Too many so-called system administrators do not understand the stakes involved when they manage users. Disgruntled former employees can often cause significant trouble for a company by gaining access to the network.

To remove a user, you need to learn to manage all of his or her files, mailboxes, mail aliases, print jobs, recurring –(automatic) personal processes such as the backing up of data or remote syncing of directories, and other references to the user. It is a good idea at first to disable the account in /etc/passwd, after which you can search for the user's files and other references. Once all traces of the user have been cleaned up, you can remove the user completely—but if you remove the entry from /etc/passwd while these other references exist, you have a harder time referring to them .

When you remove a user, it's a good idea to follow a pre-determined course of action so you don't forget any important steps; it may even be a good idea to make a checklist so that you have a routine. Following, you will find several items requiring attention.
Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Lenny

Post date: July 14, 2009, 09:07 Category: Installing Views: 7433 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Lenny. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink