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FreeBSD

Setting Up a FreeBSD Router, Step-by-Step

Post date: December 15, 2006, 01:12 Category: Network Views: 5727 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a tutorial covering most aspects of setting up a software router using FreeBSD. This includes configuring PPPoE, IPNAT, DHCPD, and the forwarding DNS server. The tutorial will walk you through setting up a working router with network address translation on a PPPoE connection, that allows you to forward ports.
Debian

Debian Networking Tutorial for Beginners and advanced users

Post date: December 14, 2006, 18:12 Category: Network Views: 3846 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is detailed step step debian networking tutorial for Beginners and advanced users.This includes Configuring your network using GUI,Command line,using ifconfig with examples and troubleshooting your network tips.
Solaris

Configuring the Behavior of the Solaris IP Filter Firewall

Post date: April 20, 2007, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 9105 Comments
Tutorial quote: When defining packet filtering rules in the /etc/ipf/ipf.conf file, it is necessary to understand how the Solaris IP Filter firewall reads this file and compares any packet against the rules in the file.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache - Don't Succumb To The "Slashdot Effect"

Post date: January 31, 2006, 03:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 3889 Comments
Tutorial quote: Like many techno-geeks I host my LAMP website on a cheap ($150) computer and my broadband connection. I have also wondered what would happen if my site was linked on Slashdot or Digg. Specifically, would my setup be able to survive the "Slashdot Effect?" A Pentium 100mhz can easily saturate a T1's worth of bandwidth and my upload speed is capped (supposedly) at 384kbps, so the server should easily be able to handle that. My bandwidth will be saturated before the server is incapacitated, at least that's the idea.
OpenSUSE

Webmin installation and configuration on OpenSuSe

Post date: November 17, 2008, 11:11 Category: Installing Views: 4170 Comments
Tutorial quote: Webmin, developed by Jamie Cameron, acts as a comprehensive interface to the underlying applications on servers, including support for configuring applications like ftp, ssh, mail, Web, databases and more. Differing from other control panels, the core Webmin interface is intended for system administrators with root access to their servers, and includes a user-based package to enable your users (or clients) to access their own domains, email, and more, within a limited scope. Webmin supports running under SSL.
Debian

Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable

Post date: February 3, 2006, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 3642 Comments
Tutorial quote: For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq. For those who you wish to learn how to use ISC's BIND and DHCP, for example as a learning exercise, this is how I got it all to work in Debian Sarge, the current stable version of Debian GNU/Linux.

This short article was prompted by my question on the Debian-Administration forum site, where I was able to get some answers to the issues I faced and I did promise to post a solution if I got one.
Linux

Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 2590 Comments
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
FreeBSD

Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4

Post date: December 1, 2005, 03:12 Category: Software Views: 4608 Comments
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Ubuntu

How to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty)

Post date: April 24, 2009, 06:04 Category: System Views: 3740 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop and Server editions and Ubuntu Netbook Remix, continuing Ubuntuís tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.This tutorial will explain how to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibix) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) released on the 23rd March 2009.

Linux

NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 2867 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
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