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Linux

NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 2832 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Debian

Securing Debian Manual

Post date: January 1, 2008, 13:01 Category: Security Views: 3636 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes security in the Debian project and in the Debian operating system. Starting with the process of securing and hardening the default Debian GNU/Linux distribution installation, it also covers some of the common tasks to set up a secure network environment using Debian GNU/Linux, gives additional information on the security tools available and talks about how security is enforced in Debian by the security and audit team.
Linux

Accessing Windows Or Samba Shares Using AutoFS

Post date: December 14, 2006, 20:12 Category: Network Views: 3873 Comments
Tutorial quote: You already installed Linux on your networked desktop PC and now you want to work with files stored on some other PCs in your network. This is where autofs comes into play. This tutorial shows how to configure autofs to use CIFS to access Windows or Samba shares from Linux Desktop PCs. It also includes a tailored configuration file.
Ubuntu

SAMBA (Domaincontroller) Server For Small Workgroups With Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: November 23, 2007, 10:11 Category: Installing Views: 3224 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about setting up an Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 7.10) to act as file- and printserver for Windows(tm) workstations in small workgroups. This howto uses the tdb backend for SAMBA to store passwords and account information. This is suitable for workgroups for up to 250 users and is easier to set up than an LDAP backend.
Linux

Enhancing kernel security with grsecurity

Post date: November 25, 2005, 21:11 Category: Security Views: 2823 Comments
Tutorial quote: Is your server as secure as it could be? Sure, you use a firewall, mandate strong passwords, and patch regularly. You even take a proactive approach by performing security audits with tools such as nmap and Nessus. Yet you may still be vulnerable to zero-day exploits and privilege escalation attacks. If these possibilities keep you awake at night, you're not alone. The sleepless folks with the grsecurity project have developed an easy-to-use set of security enhancements to help put your fears to rest.
Debian

Mini-Howto for User Mode Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2244 Comments
Tutorial quote: UML ("User Mode Linux") allows you to run multiple Linux servers on one physical machine. This can be handy for many different purposes. For example, you might want to give different people root rights, but prevent them from interfering with one another. Or, you might want to have several identically configured servers, one for production, one for development, and one for testing, but without investing in multiple physical machines.

Once you have prepared your machine for running UML instances as described in the following section, adding new instances will take less than five minutes. The preparation, however, might take a bit longer.
Debian

Building Kernel Modules With Module-Assistant On Debian Lenny

Post date: January 26, 2010, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3191 Comments
Tutorial quote: module-assistant is a tool for building Debian kernel modules from source, without having to rebuild the whole kernel. It fetches module-source packages that have been prepared for the Debian distribution via apt and produces .deb packages. This tutorial shows how to use module-assistant in command-line mode and in interactive mode.
Unix+clones

How to Block Ads With Adzap

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 2751 Comments
Tutorial quote: For some time at my workplace we've been running an ad-zapping service on our web proxy. This page documents how it works, how to use it yourself, how to join the mailing list for updates of the pattern file, and the weirdnesses of our local setup (which you need not duplicate yourself).
Unix+clones

Screen: an introduction and beginner's tutorial

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Software Views: 2512 Comments
Tutorial quote: Most modern Unix-based operating systems (e.g. Linux, MacOS X, and BSD) come with a little console-mode utility called GNU Screen. It's a powerful tool in the hands of the console warrior, a veritable Swiss Army knife of text-mode human-computer interaction.

This utility, despite its considerable usefulness, goes unused by a great many people. Why is this? Few people even know it's there, and those that do rarely understand the problem it solves. In this article, I will explain what screen does for you, and provide a simple set of instructions for accomplishing basic tasks using screen. My audience is those that are skilled with the command line but who have little or no experience with screen itself.
Unix+clones

Enhance boot-time security with GRUB passwords

Post date: April 26, 2006, 13:04 Category: Security Views: 2940 Comments
Tutorial quote: The security of data files on your computer is at risk, and not just because you are connected to the Internet. Anyone with physical access to your machine can bypass all passwords to gain entry to your hard disk with one simple command given to the bootloader. Fortunately, the popular GRand Unified Bootloader (GRUB) is equipped with security features to prevent such an 'attack.' It can password protect each entry of your boot menu.
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