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Search results for Controlling your locale with environment variables

Linux

Controlling your locale with environment variables

Post date: May 2, 2006, 12:05 Category: System Views: 2781 Comments
Tutorial quote: People all over the world use Linux in dozens of languages. Since Linux's source code is free and open, speakers of minority languages can add support for their languages themselves, even though a large corporation might not consider them a worthwhile market. If you use more than one language, or a language other than English, you should know about Linux's use of locales to support different languages. Indeed, understanding locales can be useful even if you only use English.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7484 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Unix+clones

Python Programming for Beginners

Post date: September 19, 2006, 09:09 Category: Programming Views: 44100 Comments
Tutorial quote: Despite what assembly code and C coders might tell us, high-level languages do have their place in every programmer's toolbox, and some of them are much more than a computer-science curiosity. Out of the many high-level languages we can choose from today, Python seems to be the most interesting for those who want to learn something new and do real work at the same time. Its no-nonsense implementation of object-oriented programming and its clean and easy-to-understand syntax make it a language that is fun to learn and use, which is not something we can say about most other languages.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write applications that use command-line options, read and write to pipes, access environment variables, handle interrupts, read from and write to files, create temporary files and write to system logs. In other words, you will find recipes for writing real applications instead of the old boring Hello, World! stuff.
Linux

MySQLTuner - Performance Tunning MySQL on Linux

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Optimizing Views: 4339 Comments
Tutorial quote: MySQLTuner is a script written in Perl that allows you to review a MySQL installation quickly and make adjustments to increase performance and stability. The current configuration variables and status data is retrieved and presented in a brief format along with some basic performance suggestions.
Unix+clones

Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Post date: November 26, 2005, 01:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 3679 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Gentoo

GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks

Post date: April 20, 2005, 10:04 Category: Security Views: 3083 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.
Gentoo

Bandwidth limiting howto

Post date: June 13, 2005, 02:06 Category: Network Views: 4232 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux has a very powerful mechanism for controlling network bandwidth usage. As being powerful inevitably implies being complex, this feature is documented in lengthy and exhaustive documents in great details. These documents however can prove to be excessive in their length and language to users who are looking for simple solutions for simple questions. This guide aims to give a short and practical introduction on how to solve some common issues that users tend to experience on an everyday basis.
OpenSUSE

LXDE - Light Weight Desktop Environment for openSUSE Linux

Post date: August 11, 2008, 19:08 Category: Desktop Views: 4886 Comments
Tutorial quote: Install configure and use LXDE desktop environment in openSUSE. LXDE is a new project aimed to provide a new desktop environment which is lightweight and fast. It’s not designed to be powerful and bloated, but to be usable and slim enough, and keep the resource usage low. Different from other desktop environments, LXDE doesn’t tightly integrate every component. Instead, LXDE makes all components independent, and each of them can be used independently with few dependencies.
Linux

Setting Up An iSCSI Environment On Linux

Post date: August 29, 2007, 22:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3767 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nowadays, the iSCSI technology is quite popular in the storage world. This article shows an iSCSI demo environment which consists of one Debian Linux host and one Netapp Filer. We try to show the most important features of this protocol.
OpenSUSE

Removing Internet Junks (ads, banners, pop-ups, etc ..) using privoxy on OpenSuSe

Post date: April 20, 2009, 09:04 Category: Security Views: 3859 Comments
Tutorial quote: Privoxy is a Web proxy based on Internet Junkbuster with advanced filtering capabilities for protecting privacy, filtering Web page content, managing cookies, controlling access, and removing ads, banners, pop-ups, and other obnoxious Internet junk. Privoxy has a very flexible configuration and can be customized to suit individual needs and tastes. Privoxy is useful for both stand-alone systems and multi-user networks.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink