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Search results for Convert Physical Windows Systems Into Virtual Machines To Be Run On A Linux Desktop

Ubuntu

How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 9, 2007, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3443 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Mandriva

How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Mandriva 2007 Spring

Post date: September 3, 2007, 22:09 Category: Desktop Views: 3591 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on a Mandriva 2007 Spring desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions.
Ubuntu

How To Use NTFS Drives/Partitions Under Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Post date: January 7, 2007, 21:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3444 Comments
Tutorial quote: Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions. It covers the usage of internal NTFS partitions (e.g. in a dual-boot environment) and of external USB NTFS drives.
Proxmox+VE

KVM & OpenVZ Virtualization And Cloud Computing With Proxmox VE

Post date: February 17, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 19069 Comments
Tutorial quote: Proxmox VE (virtual environment) is a distribution based on Debian Etch (x86_64); it provides an OpenSource virtualization platform for running virtual machines (OpenVZ and KVM) and comes with a powerful, web-based control panel (it includes a web-based graphical console that you can use to connect to the virtual machines). With Proxmox VE, you can even create a cluster of virtualization hosts and create/control virtual machines on remote hosts from the control panel. Proxmox VE also supports live migration of virtual machines from one host to the other. This guide shows how you can use Proxmox VE to control KVM and OpenVZ virtual machines and how to create a small computing cloud with it.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 13 Server

Post date: June 20, 2010, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 2355 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 13 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 14 Server

Post date: December 19, 2010, 17:12 Category: Installing Views: 2377 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 14 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
OpenSUSE

Virtualization With KVM On An OpenSUSE 11.3 Server

Post date: January 6, 2011, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 2637 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an OpenSUSE 11.3 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
CentOS

Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 5.2 Server

Post date: April 12, 2009, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 4065 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a CentOS 5.2 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 11 Server

Post date: June 21, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 3212 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 11 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Post date: March 22, 2009, 13:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2950 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
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