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Search results for Creating A Local Yum Repository (CentOS)

Debian

Setting up Subversion and websvn on Debian

Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: Network Views: 6145 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto will illustrate a way to install and configure Subversion and websvn on a Debian server with the following features:
- multiple repository Subversion
- access to the repositories via WebDAV (https, https) and ssh
- Linux system account access control and/or Apache level access control
- a secured websvn (php web application for easy code browsing)
- configured syntax coloring in websvn with gnu enscript
CentOS

How To Install VMware Server On A CentOS 5.0 Desktop

Post date: May 19, 2007, 00:05 Category: Desktop Views: 4290 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server on a CentOS 5.0 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).
Debian

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Post date: December 17, 2005, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 2721 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Debian

Using The Bazaar Version Control System (VCS) On Debian Etch

Post date: January 22, 2008, 11:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3242 Comments
Tutorial quote: Bazaar is a distributed version control system (VCS) available under the GPL; it is similar to Subversion (svn). Bazaar is sponsored by Canonical, Ltd., the company that develops the Ubuntu Linux distribution, and therefore the Ubuntu project is the most prominent user of Bazaar. This article explains how to set up and use Bazaar on a Debian Etch system, and how to configure an SFTP-/HTTP server to host your Bazaar repository.
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 14703 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
Linux

Automating the Login Script

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2500 Comments
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Ubuntu

How to use apt-p2p For Faster Upgrades From Ubuntu 8.10 to 9.04

Post date: April 20, 2009, 07:04 Category: System Views: 3245 Comments
Tutorial quote: apt-p2p is a p2p proxy for apt dowloads, it will act as a proxy between apt requests and a repository server, downloading any request files from peers (if possible), else will fallback to direct HTTP download. In general, apt-p2p save bandwidth, use limited cpu and memory resources and reduce congestion on the ubuntu mirrors.apt-p2p will get the request files from peers, therefore, it will avoid the congestion on the ubuntu mirrors.

Unix+clones

How to Block Ads With Adzap

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 2796 Comments
Tutorial quote: For some time at my workplace we've been running an ad-zapping service on our web proxy. This page documents how it works, how to use it yourself, how to join the mailing list for updates of the pattern file, and the weirdnesses of our local setup (which you need not duplicate yourself).
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 4916 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Ubuntu

How To Install Google Earth On Ubuntu 10.10

Post date: November 21, 2010, 20:11 Category: Desktop Views: 2461 Comments
Tutorial quote: In previous Ubuntu versions, there was a Google Earth .deb package available in the Medibuntu repository; unfortunately there is no such package for Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat). While it is possible to install the Google Earth package for Ubuntu 10.04 on Ubuntu 10.10, there is another way of installing Google Earth on Ubuntu 10.10. The method described in this tutorial will create a Google Earth .deb package for Ubuntu 10.10 from which Google Earth can be installed.
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