Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Creating A Local Yum Repository (CentOS)

Debian

Manipulating the windows upon your desktop

Post date: January 19, 2006, 13:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3345 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're like me you'll most likely use a wide variety of desktop applications, and spend a lot of time setting up your desktop first thing in the afternoon when you login. Minimising some applications, setting others up to be visible upon all virtual desktops, etc. Even if you have a basic window manager you can automate this activity using Devil's Pie.

Devil's Pie is a simple utility, inspired by the Sawfish's matched windows option, which allows you to conduct actions upon desktop windows. Using it is a simple matter of creating a configuration file and starting the program when you login.
Linux

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Post date: January 28, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 5303 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system. On the clients minimal to no configuration is needed. BackupPC supports full and incremental backups, and it comes with a neat web frontend for the administrator and normal user so that backups and recoveries can be managed through a web browser. It should be noted, however, that BackupPC does file-based backups, not bit-wise backups like Ghost4Linux, for example, so it is not made for disk/partition imaging.
CentOS

How To Monitor A System With Sysstat On Centos 4.3

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: System Views: 6981 Comments
Tutorial quote: A common task for System Administrators is to monitor and care for a server. That's fairly easy to do at a moment's notice, but how to keep a record of this information over time? One way to monitor your server is to use the Sysstat package.

Sysstat is actually a collection of utilities designed to collect information about the performance of a linux installation, and record them over time.

It's fairly easy to install too, since it is included as a package on many distributions.
Debian

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 25, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 3953 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Debian

Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Lenny Server

Post date: March 17, 2009, 11:03 Category: Installing Views: 5254 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Lenny server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Mandriva

Virtualization With KVM On A Mandriva 2010.0 Server

Post date: March 25, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 5108 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Mandriva 2010.0 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Debian

Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Squeeze Server

Post date: March 13, 2011, 18:03 Category: Installing Views: 4005 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Squeeze server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
SuSe

Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Network Views: 7958 Comments
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!
Fedora

High-Availability Storage With GlusterFS On Fedora 12

Post date: March 2, 2010, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3476 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a high-availability storage with two storage servers (Fedora 12) that use GlusterFS. Each storage server will be a mirror of the other storage server, and files will be replicated automatically across both storage servers. The client system (Fedora 12 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

High-Availability Storage With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: January 10, 2010, 15:01 Category: Installing Views: 3729 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a high-availability storage with two storage servers (Ubuntu 9.10) that use GlusterFS. Each storage server will be a mirror of the other storage server, and files will be replicated automatically across both storage servers. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink