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Search results for Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3154 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Debian

Giving users a home directory automatically

Post date: June 16, 2006, 21:06 Category: System Views: 2851 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you are using LDAP or NIS to manage users you might discover users having problems because they don't have a home directory on each machine they can connect to. Thankfully there is a simple solution for creating home directories upon demand for users.

The Pluggable Authentication Modules library, or PAM, is a collection of shared libraries which control how users login to systems. There are a number of modules installed which can be used to restrict user access to systems in different ways. There are also several utility modules which can be used to customise login behaviour.
Ubuntu

Creating Backups With luckyBackup On An Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop

Post date: August 20, 2009, 11:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2440 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to install and use luckyBackup on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop. luckyBackup is an application for data back-up and synchronization powered by the rsync tool. It is simple to use, fast (transfers over only changes made and not all data), safe (keeps your data safe by checking all declared directories before proceeding in any data manipulation ), reliable and fully customizable.
Linux

Entering A Safe Mirror When Logging In With Unionfs And Chroot

Post date: June 28, 2007, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2598 Comments
Tutorial quote: When reading a hint on the website of LinuxFromScratch I discovered the special capabilities of unionfs, specially in combination with chroot. Later I read a HowTo on a wikiwebsite of Gentoo, about entering a chrooted home directory when using a special script as shell. Combining these two brings me to using a chrooted environment, which you enter when logging in as a special user. This environment is an exact copy (mirror) of the system you are working on. Because you are in safe copy of the real system, you can do whatever you like, it will never change the system, everything stays inside the cache (the readwrite branch).
Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4365 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With TimeVault On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: December 20, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3228 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up, configure and use TimeVault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.
Linux

Linux Directory Structure Overview

Post date: March 26, 2008, 10:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3674 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the most noticeable differences between Linux and Windows is the directory structure. Not only is the format different, but the logic of where to find things is different.This tutorial will explain about Linux Directory Structure Overview with graphical image.
Debian

Removing Unwanted Startup Debian Files or Services

Post date: January 5, 2007, 07:01 Category: System Views: 3478 Comments
Tutorial quote: Under Debian Linux ( and most other distros) startup files are stored in /etc/init.d/ directory and symbolic linked between /etc/rcX.d/ directory exists. Debian Linux (Red Hat/ Fedora) uses System V initialization scripts to start services at boot time from /etc/rcX.d/ directory. Debian Linux comes with different utilities to remove unwanted startup files.
Linux

Chrooting Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 2711 Comments
Tutorial quote: The chroot daemon allows you to run a program and have it see a given directory as the root (/) directory. This effectively locks the process into its very own filesystem ("chroot jail") isolated from the real / filesystem. In this article we will look at how to install the Apache Web server in such an environment.
Debian

Triggering Commands On File/Directory Changes With Incron

Post date: September 2, 2008, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3461 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can install and use incron on a Debian Etch system. Incron is similar to cron, but instead of running commands based on time, it can trigger commands when file or directory events occur (e.g. a file modification, changes of permissions, etc.).
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