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Debian

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Post date: December 17, 2005, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 2720 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Fedora+Core

Installing Beryl Or Compiz Fusion On A Fedora 7 Desktop

Post date: July 1, 2007, 23:07 Category: Desktop Views: 8181 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use Beryl or Compiz Fusion on a Fedora 7 desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card). With both Beryl and Compiz Fusion, you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube.
Linux

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

Post date: January 23, 2007, 23:01 Category: System Views: 3771 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).
Ubuntu+Studio

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 11.10

Post date: October 25, 2011, 09:10 Category: Desktop Views: 19232 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu Studio 11.10 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Please note that Ubuntu Studio 11.10 uses Xfce as the default desktop environment (instead of GNOME).
Ubuntu

How To Configure Remote Access To Your Ubuntu Desktop

Post date: February 14, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 4102 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can enable a remote desktop on an Ubuntu desktop so that you can access and control it remotely. This makes sense for example if you have customers that are not very tech-savvy. If they have a problem, you can log in to their desktops without the need to drive to their location. I will also show how to access the remote Ubuntu desktop from a Windows XP client and an Ubuntu client.
Ubuntu

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu Classic 11.04 Desktop (GNOME)

Post date: July 7, 2011, 11:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2677 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) desktop with the classic GNOME interface, i.e., no Unity (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card - I'm using an NVIDIA GeForce 8200 here). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.
Mandriva

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva One 2010.1 Spring With GNOME

Post date: July 20, 2010, 11:07 Category: Desktop Views: 4566 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva One 2010.1 Spring desktop (with the GNOME desktop environment) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
SuSe

Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards

Post date: May 12, 2006, 13:05 Category: Desktop Views: 4299 Comments
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
Ubuntu

Introduction To The Ubuntu Unity Desktop

Post date: August 18, 2011, 08:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2643 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is supposed to guide the reader through some new features of the Unity desktop, Ubuntu's new desktop environment used since Ubuntu 11.04. The prime subject will be the launcher, which is something like a side-dock, and how to configure it the way it fits your likings most.
Linux

Automating the Login Script

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2500 Comments
Tutorial quote: In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine. The information and examples presented in this article assume that you are using the bash shell. However, you can modify all of the scripts so that they work in other shells. In some cases, they might even work unmodified (like in the standard Bourne Shell [sh]). Other shells will also work, but they might have different methods for changing the prompt and creating command aliases. The principles in this article should be relatively easy to adapt to the shell of your choice.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink