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Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With TimeVault On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: December 20, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3842 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up, configure and use TimeVault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.
Unix+clones

Setup the SSH server to use keys for authentication

Post date: November 16, 2005, 20:11 Category: Network Views: 3808 Comments
Tutorial quote: The user creates a keypair, which consists of a private key, that can be protected with a passphrase, and a public key. The public key is transfered to the server and the private key is kept in our workstation. We assume that the user has accounts in both the server machine and his workstation. Everytime he tries to connect to the server, the keys are validated and the user is granted access.
OpenSUSE

Write your own kernel module and insert it into running kernel

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Programming Views: 5414 Comments
Tutorial quote: So, you want to write a kernel module. You know C, you've written a few normal programs to run as processes, and now you want to get to where the real action is, to where a single wild pointer can wipe out your file system and a core dump means a reboot.

kernel Modules are pieces of code that can be loaded and unloaded into the kernel upon demand. They extend the functionality of the kernel without the need to reboot the system. For example, one type of module is the device driver, which allows the kernel to access hardware connected to the system.
Linux

Storing Files/Directories In Memory With tmpfs

Post date: December 9, 2008, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3599 Comments
Tutorial quote: You probably know that reading from RAM is a lot of faster than reading files from the hard drive, and reduces your disk I/O. This article shows how you can store files and directories in memory instead of on the hard drive with the help of tmpfs (a file system for creating memory devices). This is ideal for file caches and other temporary data (such as PHP's session files if you are using session.save_handler = files) because the data is lost when you power down or reboot the system.
Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

Post date: October 23, 2007, 07:10 Category: Desktop Views: 4460 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up an Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) desktop. The result is a fast, secure and extendable system that provides all you need for daily work and entertainment. About 23.000 packages are available in the repositories.
Linux

Building a Linux supercomputer using SSH and PVM

Post date: April 11, 2006, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 3796 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have a couple of old Linux boxes sitting around, then you've got the makings of a supercomputer. Dust them off, install Secure Shell (SSH) and Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM), and start your complex algorithms.
Unix+clones

Security Testing your Apache Configuration with Nikto

Post date: August 29, 2006, 16:08 Category: Security Views: 4273 Comments
Tutorial quote: By now you've got the perfect setup for your new Ubuntu 6.0.6 (Dapper Drake) box. You may have even followed the excellent Intrusion Detection and Prevention with BASE and Snort tutorial. And as an added precaution you installed DenyHosts to prevent hack attempts via ssh. But now that you've got your new LAMP server on the internet, how can you tell that your new web server is secure? You test it, of course!
Unix+clones

Unattended rdiff-backup HOWTO

Post date: April 3, 2006, 08:04 Category: Software Views: 4611 Comments
Tutorial quote: This page describes how to set up rdiff-backup to run, as a non-root user, unattended from a crontab. We will utilize features of rdiff-backup and OpenSSH to secure the setup as much as possible.
Linux

How To Set Up Linux As A Dial-In Server

Post date: January 21, 2007, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 4533 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to attach modems to a Linux box and allow it to receive calls to connect users to the network. It is like being your own ISP (Internet Service Provider). If your Linux box is connected to the Internet, then the users will also be connected to the Internet. Your Linux box becomes a router. This is also known as RAS (Remote Access Services) in the Microsoft world. In the Linux world it is called PPP (Point to Point Protocol).
Linux

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

Post date: January 23, 2007, 23:01 Category: System Views: 4499 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).
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