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Mandriva

The Perfect Desktop - Part 2: Mandriva Free 2007

Post date: February 27, 2007, 18:02 Category: Desktop Views: 4486 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial is the second in a series of articles where I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Mandriva Free 2007 in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
CentOS

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS (CentOS 5.4)

Post date: March 23, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 4309 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running CentOS 5.4) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (CentOS 5.4 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Fedora

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Fedora 12

Post date: March 9, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 3174 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Fedora 12) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Fedora 12 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: January 19, 2010, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 3434 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Ubuntu 9.10) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Linux

Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3480 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.
Debian

OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

Post date: December 26, 2006, 21:12 Category: System Views: 4125 Comments
Tutorial quote: Virtualization is a good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable, all this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide was written during an install of a Supermicro machine with two dual-core opterons (64-bit), two identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.
Unix+clones

Making Web Browsing Easy For The Tiny Screen

Post date: August 9, 2005, 19:08 Category: Network Views: 3632 Comments
Tutorial quote: An avalanche of content will soon appear in the palm of your hand.

Tiny screens are showing up everywhere in PDAs and cell phones. Many are equipped with some form of network device and a browser, so it's not hard to see what's coming down the pike.

Late model PDAs, like my HP iPAQ 3715 no longer suffer from insufficient computing power, lack of memory or having to rely on pricey external 802.11b cards. The little machine is quick to boot up and can handle many daily business functions.

Even though it runs a version of Internet Explorer, jumping onto an access point and browsing web pages is fast and useful.

In this edition, I'll share my observations on things you might consider when converting LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) applications or web pages, for use on the tiny screen. I'll approach the issues from an iPAQ user perspective and focus on convenience and making the user's life easy.
Linux

How To Secure An SSL VPN With One-Time Passcodes And Mutual Authentication

Post date: June 30, 2007, 23:06 Category: Security Views: 4330 Comments
Tutorial quote: SSL-based VPNs were designed to eliminate the need for complex configurations on the user's PC. Unfortunately, that was before the dangers of public WiFi networks and tougher regulatory requirements came into being. Thanks to WiFi, many attacks that were difficult are now quite simple. In particular, a man-in-the-middle attack can intercept SSL-encrypted traffic, rendering SSL-based VPNs useless - even if it is protected by a typical one-time password system. The man-in-the-middle can easily feed the one-time password into the SSL-based VPN within the alloted time.
Debian

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 30, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4530 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Mandriva

Distributed Replicated Storage Across 4 Nodes With GlusterFS On Mandriva 2010.0

Post date: April 20, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 5074 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Mandriva 2010.0) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Mandriva 2010.0 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
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