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Search results for Disk ARchive (Backup and Restore) using dar and kdar(dar Frontend)

Unix+clones

Unattended rdiff-backup HOWTO

Post date: April 3, 2006, 08:04 Category: Software Views: 3966 Comments
Tutorial quote: This page describes how to set up rdiff-backup to run, as a non-root user, unattended from a crontab. We will utilize features of rdiff-backup and OpenSSH to secure the setup as much as possible.
OpenSUSE

Krsync - A Kommander based GUI frontend for rsync

Post date: January 11, 2009, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 3562 Comments
Tutorial quote: Krsync is a simple GUI frontend for the famous rsync to synchronize files and directories between systems or even two different directories on the same server. Krsync is a Kommander based GUI for rsync.
Linux

Build a Home Terabyte Backup System Using Linux

Post date: December 1, 2005, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3194 Comments
Tutorial quote: A terabyte-plus backup and storage system is now an affordable option for Linux users. This article discusses options for building and configuring an inexpensive, expandable, Linux-based backup server.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 2508 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
OSX

Recover a dead hard drive using dd

Post date: October 23, 2006, 03:10 Category: System Views: 15355 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Unix program dd is a disk copying util that you can use at the command line in order to make a disk image. It makes a bit-by-bit copy of the drive it's copying, caring nothing about filesystem type, files, or anything else. It's a great way to workaround the need for Norton Ghost.

Normally, in order to make a disk image, the disk you're copying from has to be able to spin up and talk -- in other words, it's OK to make a copy if the disk is healthy. But what happens when your disk is becoming a doorstop? As long as it continues to spin, even with physical damage on the drive, dd and Mac OS X will get you out of the fire.
Debian

Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch

Post date: December 18, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3292 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you rent a dedicated server nowadays, almost all providers give you FTP backup space for your server on one of the provider's backup systems. This tutorial shows how you can use duplicity and ftplicity to create encrypted (so that nobody with access to the backup server can read sensitive data in your backups) backups on the provider's remote backup server over FTP. ftplicity is a duplicity wrapper script (provided by the German computer magazine c't) that allows us to use duplicity without interaction (i.e., you do not have to type in any passwords).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With TimeVault On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: December 20, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3206 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up, configure and use TimeVault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.
Unix+clones

Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2845 Comments
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.
Ubuntu

How To Back Up An Ubuntu 8.10 System With SystemImager

Post date: November 13, 2008, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3242 Comments
Tutorial quote: SystemImager lets you create images of your Linux installations. To do so, you need an image server (should have enough disk space to store your images) and a so-called golden client (i.e., the system of which you want to make an image). This means that you have to install some software on your image server and on your golden client in order to run SystemImager. This tutorial shows how to install a SystemImager server and a SystemImager client, both using Ubuntu 8.10, and how to create/update/restore/delete images.
Debian

Recovering from file system corruption using TestDisk

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: System Views: 2803 Comments
Tutorial quote: We've all been there. We press the wrong key, we do some silly mistake, and suddenly, one or more of our file systems refuse to work. Whenever this happens, the first thing we hear is "You should have made a backup", the dreaded sentence that we'll never listen to. Let's face it, we're stupid, and we don't backup.
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