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Search results for Disk Based Backups With Amanda On Debian Etch

Debian

Disk Based Backups With Amanda On Debian Etch

Post date: September 23, 2007, 10:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3742 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up Amanda (The Advanced Maryland Automatic Network Disk Archiver) on Debian Etch. For this tutorial I chose Ubuntu v7.04 as a backup-client. The resulting system provides a flexible backup system with many features. It will be able to back up multiple hosts via network to various devices. I chose the disk based backup for this howto.
Debian

Disk Backup With Amanda On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 17, 2010, 12:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3066 Comments
Tutorial quote: Amanda is an open source client/server solution to back up filesystems. Backups are triggered by the backup server, backup definitions are located on the servers but exclusion lists are located on the client.
Debian

Scheduled Backups With Rsyncbackup On Debian Etch

Post date: April 13, 2008, 12:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3149 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up and configure rsyncbackup on Debian Etch. Rsyncbackup is a Perl script that cooperates with rsync. It is easy to configure and able to create scheduled backups (partial and incremental backups).
Debian

Using ATA Over Ethernet On Debian Etch

Post date: October 17, 2007, 11:10 Category: Hardware Views: 6023 Comments
Tutorial quote: Imagine you have a machine with all of its disk full and another with unused gigabytes, and you do not want to move the data from one to the other. Why not use the second's disk on the first, you could do it with iSCSI, but you can do it with ATA over Ethernet (AoE) as well. It is the second method I will explain in this article. All of this was made with two computers running Debian Etch.
Linux

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Post date: January 28, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 4430 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system. On the clients minimal to no configuration is needed. BackupPC supports full and incremental backups, and it comes with a neat web frontend for the administrator and normal user so that backups and recoveries can be managed through a web browser. It should be noted, however, that BackupPC does file-based backups, not bit-wise backups like Ghost4Linux, for example, so it is not made for disk/partition imaging.
Debian

Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch

Post date: December 18, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you rent a dedicated server nowadays, almost all providers give you FTP backup space for your server on one of the provider's backup systems. This tutorial shows how you can use duplicity and ftplicity to create encrypted (so that nobody with access to the backup server can read sensitive data in your backups) backups on the provider's remote backup server over FTP. ftplicity is a duplicity wrapper script (provided by the German computer magazine c't) that allows us to use duplicity without interaction (i.e., you do not have to type in any passwords).
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3003 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3311 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Linux

Xen: How to Convert An Image-Based Guest To An LVM-Based Guest

Post date: April 19, 2009, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3117 Comments
Tutorial quote: This short article explains how you can move/convert a Xen guest that uses disk images to LVM volumes. Virtual machines that use disk images are very slow and heavy on disk IO, therefore it is often better to use LVM. Also, LVM-based guests are easier to back up (using LVM snapshots).
Debian

Using DSPAM & ClamAV With Postfix (Virtual Users) On Debian Etch

Post date: August 14, 2007, 23:08 Category: Security Views: 3326 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to integrate DSPAM with embedded ClamAV into a mail server based on Postfix featuring virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. DSPAM is a scalable and open-source content-based spam filter. The setup shown here is suitable for Debian Etch servers.
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