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Search results for Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3052 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Unix+clones

Create Incremental Snapshot-style Backups With rSync And SSH

Post date: August 29, 2006, 16:08 Category: Network Views: 3191 Comments
Tutorial quote: As neither human nor computers are perfect (humans err / computers may fail) it is quite obvious that a good backup system will prevent from too much damage once the computer may go down. This could be either because the harddrive is failing or because of hackers or because you accidentally deleted something important.

In this tutorial I will show you how to automate backups automatically in an incremental snapshot-style way by using rSync.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: February 3, 2008, 13:02 Category: Desktop Views: 3358 Comments
Tutorial quote: FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Debian

Scheduled Backups With Rsyncbackup On Debian Etch

Post date: April 13, 2008, 12:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3198 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up and configure rsyncbackup on Debian Etch. Rsyncbackup is a Perl script that cooperates with rsync. It is easy to configure and able to create scheduled backups (partial and incremental backups).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 9.04

Post date: July 27, 2009, 10:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2066 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: March 11, 2008, 10:03 Category: Desktop Views: 2786 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
Unix+clones

Create Urban Style Artwork/Wallpaper using Gimp

Post date: July 23, 2008, 17:07 Category: Software Views: 5283 Comments
Tutorial quote: Twentieth Century has brought some tremendous change in the lifestyle of people.. After Technology , the field that has witnessed complete makeover is Fashion.. Whether its dressing up yourself ,home, or your desktop.. the design has gained a total new facelift.. From Auqa , to Aurora to Waves to Aero Style and now to Grungy and Urban Style.. Yes Urban style is the talk of the town these days.. You can notice these style in advertisements, cartoons, dresses, wallpapers and everywhere.. All these style are result of Digital Art..

You can easily create Urban/Grungy style artwork/wallpaper .. Though it looked tough at first sight but its the most easiest artwork to learn and create. Thanks to Vector Brushes..
Unix+clones

Encrypted remote backups made easy

Post date: November 29, 2006, 01:11 Category: Security Views: 3713 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is an easy way to take backups and putting them on a remote site. I invented this script in order to put backups on a reliable remote site where I unfortunatley only have a user account.
Unix+clones

Backup Your Website Automatically With Wget and Cron

Post date: December 23, 2007, 18:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3230 Comments
Tutorial quote: Lets face it, no one likes performing manual backups. Often if monotonous tasks are not automated in some way (which they should be, that is why computers were invented) they will be forgotten and not performed regularly.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With TimeVault On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: December 20, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3247 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up, configure and use TimeVault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.
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